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Authors’ Guidelines

We welcome articles on all aspects of political studies, foreign affairs and social and cultural as well as historical studies related to the international relations.

Articles should represent the results of original research, new findings and/or in-depth analysis of the latest trends in the field nominated above.

Recommended size of the article: research article generally should not exceed 35 000 printed characters with spaces (annotation included).

Articles should be composed with respect to the IMRAD principles and should include separate annotation (of 250-400 words), keywords (4-9 words), author(s)’ academic affiliation, contacts and his/her research ID(s).

We are using the Harvard reference system in our journal and cordially ask authors to adhere to its standards. Authors should refrain from page- and/or endnotes. All references to sources and cited materials should follow Harvard practices of referencing.

For the guidelines, please refer to: http://www.citethisforme.com/harvard-referencing (brief guide), OR https://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/files/Harvard_referencing_201718.pdf (DETAILED GUIDE)

For further notice, please, refer to the authors’ submission guideline (in Russian)

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Publisher's column

No Need to Wait for an Attack, the Threat of War Is in the Air

“Russia and China need to think about creating a joint strategy to strengthen peace. There is no need to wait for someone’s attack – the threat of war in the air,” Valdai Club expert Sergei Karaganov, who takes part in the Russian-Chinese conference in Shanghai.

Editor's column

Russia can be the honest broker in Korean diplomacy

Only joint efforts with US, China, North and South Korea will bring a lasting deal


World Cup 2018: Behind the scenes on Putin's oil deals and diplomatic wrangling

‘We have to convince people that Russia is a normal country, not the caricature published in Western newspapers’

Everyone Wins: Russia, China, and the Trump-Kim Summit

The summit of Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un in Singapore brought the Korean peninsula closer to peace, but it was more about symbolism than substance. Its most important outcome is to bring North Korea out of diplomatic isolation—something that is welcome to both China and Russia.

Moscow’s Maghreb Moment

Russia is regaining influence in North Africa thanks to weapons, energy, and trade.

Infrastructure Connectivity and Political Stability in Eurasia

The country’s geographic location largely predetermines its foreign policy, as well as the trajectory of its socioeconomic development. However, even the most negative geographical limitations can be overcome via connectivity and compatibility that are the passport to the success of Eurasian integration.

A Pyrrhic Victory: the History of the Sanctions War Against Iran

The history of sanctions against Iran deserves close analysis in light of the growing sanctions pressure on Russia. Although Iran and Russia are different countries facing different sanctions paradigms, Iran’s experience is meaningful if only because both countries have to contend with US sanction law.