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Fyodor Lukyanov

Fyodor Lukyanov is Editor-in-Chief of Russia in Global Affairs, Chairman of the Presidium of the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy, and Research Director of the Valdai International Discussion Club.

  • 10 february 2007

    On the Eve of Change

    Russia is entering a momentous election season. In December, Russian voters will elect a new parliament, while in March 2008 they will vote for a new president.

  • 7 february 2007

    Where to Focus If You Are Expecting Change

    Interest in next year's presidential election is gradually eclipsing all other current events in Russia. The main pursuit of analysts and commentators has become peering across this political Rubicon into the dense fog that enshrouds the opposite bank...

  • 28 december 2006

    Time for a New Foreign Policy Look

    It is difficult to recall a single year over the past decade-and-a-half in which Russian foreign policy has generated results as contradictory as in 2006. It's almost as if there were two different Russias acting on the international stage, the first as perceived from the Russian side and the second as seen by the West...

  • 18 december 2006

    Russia Is Not Prepared to Restore the Empire

    When the Baltic countries entered NATO and the European Union a couple of years ago, many thought it was the end of the centuries-old "red line." Euro-Atlantic organizations had crossed into the former Russian and Soviet empires...

  • 29 november 2006

    Russia Is Not Prepared to Restore the Empire

    When the Baltic countries entered NATO and the European Union a couple of years ago, many thought it was the end of the centuries-old "red line." Euro-Atlantic organizations had crossed into the former Russian and Soviet empires.

  • 1 november 2006

    The Deficit of Values Behind a Crisis in Goals

    It is 17 years since the fall of the Berlin wall and 15 years since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Current events in the former "socialist world" show that the scale of difficulties involved in the transition was seriously underestimated...

  • 12 october 2006

    From Nationalism to Nation

    On the eve of the 15th anniversary of the breakup of the Soviet Union, it has become particularly obvious that Russia has not only failed to overcome the consequences of that dramatic event, but has even failed to rethink them.

  • 4 october 2006

    Saakashvili Is Playing a High-Stakes Game

    There are two features of the current crisis between Moscow and Tbilisi that differentiate it from the many difficulties between the two in the past.

  • 12 september 2006

    Old Habits Die Hard

    Everyone agrees that Sept. 11, 2001, changed the world. Much has been said and written about the impact the terrorist attacks had on the United States, how Europe responded and the Middle East was transformed, and about the effect the attacks had on the institutions of international relations in general.

  • 11 july 2006

    The Russian Season

    Russia’s G8 presidency, which will be crowned by the July summit in St. Petersburg, has become the leitmotif of Russia’s foreign policy this year.

  • 8 may 2006

    Unlearned Lessons of the Past

    The arrival of spring was marked by several anniversaries in Russia and the world.

  • 7 february 2006

    After the Empire

    This year will mark 15 years since the breakup of the Soviet Union, a dramatic event whose aftermath will determine the course of world history for a long time.

  • 21 november 2005

    Passions Over Sovereignty

    Of the many subjects of political debate in Russia in 2005, the main emphasis has been on national sovereignty.

  • 30 july 2005

    Debates About Values

    Thirty years ago, on August 1, 1975, the leaders of 35 countries gathered in Helsinki to sign the Final Act of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe.

  • 18 may 2005

    In Search of New Identity

    Russia is marking two anniversaries this spring that are of fundamental importance for its development.

  • 8 february 2005

    The Spiral of Russian History

    The year 2004 has proven to be Russian President Vladimir Putin’s most difficult year since he took office in 2000. Apart from an upsurge in terrorism, which culminated in the horrible terrorist act in Beslan, Putin faced a decrease in economic growth rates, the declining position of Moscow in the post-Soviet space, and a marked deterioration in the West’s attitude toward Moscow.

  • 25 november 2004

    Victorious Ukraine

    The preliminary outcome of the battle shows that Ukraine is a complicated and subtle political system that does not deserve a simplified approach.

  • 9 november 2004

    Russia Goes to War

    Following the recent hostage drama in Beslan, where hundreds of schoolchildren were brutally killed by terrorists, we must ask the question: “What kind of country has Russia become?”

  • 9 november 2004

    Imperial Overload

    The Kremlin has earmarked enormous resources to ensure Viktor Yanukovich’s victory in Ukraine’s presidential election, in order to prove that Russia still has influence in the post-Soviet republic, and not because it would actually benefit from that win.

  • 9 september 2004

    The Eternal Value of Autocracy

    Differences in the interpretation of the Beslan hostage drama by Russia and the West could well drive a wedge between the two sides, reducing relations to their lowest point since the demise of the Soviet empire.

  • 16 august 2004

    No Rose Is Without a Thorn

    There already was a Georgian president who failed to live up to his own popularity and subsequently drove his country into the abyss.

  • 10 august 2004

    Gone with the Wind of Change

    Fifteen years ago, in the early summer of 1989, the entire Soviet nation was glued to the television, not believing its eyes. At that time, the country held its first Congress of People’s Deputies of the Soviet Union, and it was then that public politics first arose in Russia.

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Publisher's column

A Cold War: A Forecast for Tomorrow

Nuclear deterrence is the only reason why the world did not plunge into a nuclear conflict during the Cold War and is not sliding down that path now as we are living through a new Cold War which is even worse than the previous one.

Editor's column

WEF-2018: Everybody First

If America, with its power, influence, capabilities and share in the world economy proclaims itself "First", it thereby sets the tone. So everyone will have to follow it and also to become "first of all." It's hardly worth to be glad about it. But we must be ready.


The Disruptor

Russia seeks to exploit divisions in the West. But how big is the threat?

The Central European paradox

The paradox of liberal democracy is that citizens are freer, but they feel powerless.

The Global Resurgence of Economic Nationalism

Against a background of shifting geoeconomic power from the West to the East, economic nationalism has become the development strategy that allows rising powers to reverse negative asymmetry in interdependent economic relationships.

Alt-Right: A Rise of Radical Alternative Rightist Movements in the Trumpist Framework

Alt-Right incarnation of the right-wing ideology presents a dubious and quite self-contradictive concept. What is more important is that it clearly illustrates the massive ideological and political transformation that alters the political balance in the Western countries.

Conditionality Beyond Sanctions

Identifying and Pursuing Interests in the EU-Russia Relationship.

The Demise of Ukraine’s “Eurasian Vector” and the Rise of Pro-NATO Sentiment

Before 2014, the majority of Ukrainians did not view the goal of European integration as a “national idea.” Even so, most Ukrainians had positive views about developing relations with and integrating into the EU.