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Fyodor Lukyanov

Fyodor Lukyanov is Editor-in-Chief of Russia in Global Affairs, Chairman of the Presidium of the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy, and Research Director of the Valdai International Discussion Club.

  • 28 april 2007

    New Thinking Needed

    In recent years, speculation has swirled ahead of President Vladimir Putin's annual state-of-the-nation addresses that the main thrust of the speech would be about foreign affairs. Each year there appeared to be special circumstances that called for the president to lay out his vision of the situation in the world...

  • 11 april 2007

    Increasing Supply on the World Values Market

    The Russian diplomatic corps recently published a review of the country's foreign policy. This curious document represents a code of political directives to provide guidance for those working on the international stage in Russia. A tour through this document provides interesting insights into both the country's current political course and the attitudes of the foreign policy establishment.

  • 6 april 2007

    Moscow No Match for Kiev

    For Russians the current political imbroglio in Kiev was similar to struggle for power that took place in Moscow in September and October 1993. On the outside, the two episodes look almost identical. In both cases, the heads of state lost patience with endless opposition from the parliament and opted to call for new elections. Parliament refused to recognize the decision...

  • 7 march 2007

    Russian Threat Reborn as a Matter of Necessity

    Washington's decision to place elements of an anti-ballistic missile battery in Poland and the Czech Republic has become a catalyst to a complex process in Europe. This affects not only the relationship with Russia, but also the "Old World's" strategic future as well...

  • 10 february 2007

    On the Eve of Change

    Russia is entering a momentous election season. In December, Russian voters will elect a new parliament, while in March 2008 they will vote for a new president.

  • 7 february 2007

    Where to Focus If You Are Expecting Change

    Interest in next year's presidential election is gradually eclipsing all other current events in Russia. The main pursuit of analysts and commentators has become peering across this political Rubicon into the dense fog that enshrouds the opposite bank...

  • 28 december 2006

    Time for a New Foreign Policy Look

    It is difficult to recall a single year over the past decade-and-a-half in which Russian foreign policy has generated results as contradictory as in 2006. It's almost as if there were two different Russias acting on the international stage, the first as perceived from the Russian side and the second as seen by the West...

  • 18 december 2006

    Russia Is Not Prepared to Restore the Empire

    When the Baltic countries entered NATO and the European Union a couple of years ago, many thought it was the end of the centuries-old "red line." Euro-Atlantic organizations had crossed into the former Russian and Soviet empires...

  • 29 november 2006

    Russia Is Not Prepared to Restore the Empire

    When the Baltic countries entered NATO and the European Union a couple of years ago, many thought it was the end of the centuries-old "red line." Euro-Atlantic organizations had crossed into the former Russian and Soviet empires.

  • 1 november 2006

    The Deficit of Values Behind a Crisis in Goals

    It is 17 years since the fall of the Berlin wall and 15 years since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Current events in the former "socialist world" show that the scale of difficulties involved in the transition was seriously underestimated...

  • 12 october 2006

    From Nationalism to Nation

    On the eve of the 15th anniversary of the breakup of the Soviet Union, it has become particularly obvious that Russia has not only failed to overcome the consequences of that dramatic event, but has even failed to rethink them.

  • 4 october 2006

    Saakashvili Is Playing a High-Stakes Game

    There are two features of the current crisis between Moscow and Tbilisi that differentiate it from the many difficulties between the two in the past.

  • 12 september 2006

    Old Habits Die Hard

    Everyone agrees that Sept. 11, 2001, changed the world. Much has been said and written about the impact the terrorist attacks had on the United States, how Europe responded and the Middle East was transformed, and about the effect the attacks had on the institutions of international relations in general.

  • 11 july 2006

    The Russian Season

    Russia’s G8 presidency, which will be crowned by the July summit in St. Petersburg, has become the leitmotif of Russia’s foreign policy this year.

  • 8 may 2006

    Unlearned Lessons of the Past

    The arrival of spring was marked by several anniversaries in Russia and the world.

  • 7 february 2006

    After the Empire

    This year will mark 15 years since the breakup of the Soviet Union, a dramatic event whose aftermath will determine the course of world history for a long time.

  • 21 november 2005

    Passions Over Sovereignty

    Of the many subjects of political debate in Russia in 2005, the main emphasis has been on national sovereignty.

  • 30 july 2005

    Debates About Values

    Thirty years ago, on August 1, 1975, the leaders of 35 countries gathered in Helsinki to sign the Final Act of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe.

  • 18 may 2005

    In Search of New Identity

    Russia is marking two anniversaries this spring that are of fundamental importance for its development.

  • 8 february 2005

    The Spiral of Russian History

    The year 2004 has proven to be Russian President Vladimir Putin’s most difficult year since he took office in 2000. Apart from an upsurge in terrorism, which culminated in the horrible terrorist act in Beslan, Putin faced a decrease in economic growth rates, the declining position of Moscow in the post-Soviet space, and a marked deterioration in the West’s attitude toward Moscow.

  • 25 november 2004

    Victorious Ukraine

    The preliminary outcome of the battle shows that Ukraine is a complicated and subtle political system that does not deserve a simplified approach.

  • 9 november 2004

    Russia Goes to War

    Following the recent hostage drama in Beslan, where hundreds of schoolchildren were brutally killed by terrorists, we must ask the question: “What kind of country has Russia become?”

  • 9 november 2004

    Imperial Overload

    The Kremlin has earmarked enormous resources to ensure Viktor Yanukovich’s victory in Ukraine’s presidential election, in order to prove that Russia still has influence in the post-Soviet republic, and not because it would actually benefit from that win.

  • 9 september 2004

    The Eternal Value of Autocracy

    Differences in the interpretation of the Beslan hostage drama by Russia and the West could well drive a wedge between the two sides, reducing relations to their lowest point since the demise of the Soviet empire.

  • 16 august 2004

    No Rose Is Without a Thorn

    There already was a Georgian president who failed to live up to his own popularity and subsequently drove his country into the abyss.

  • 10 august 2004

    Gone with the Wind of Change

    Fifteen years ago, in the early summer of 1989, the entire Soviet nation was glued to the television, not believing its eyes. At that time, the country held its first Congress of People’s Deputies of the Soviet Union, and it was then that public politics first arose in Russia.

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Publisher's column

No Need to Wait for an Attack, the Threat of War Is in the Air

“Russia and China need to think about creating a joint strategy to strengthen peace. There is no need to wait for someone’s attack – the threat of war in the air,” Valdai Club expert Sergei Karaganov, who takes part in the Russian-Chinese conference in Shanghai.

Editor's column

Back to Balance. New Weapons As Effective Deterrence

Many bad things have been said about nuclear weapons in the decades since they first came into existence. Indeed, in the middle of the 20th century the human race developed a means of confrontation with the potential to destroy the entire world were it used on a large scale.


World Cup 2018: Behind the scenes on Putin's oil deals and diplomatic wrangling

‘We have to convince people that Russia is a normal country, not the caricature published in Western newspapers’

Everyone Wins: Russia, China, and the Trump-Kim Summit

The summit of Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un in Singapore brought the Korean peninsula closer to peace, but it was more about symbolism than substance. Its most important outcome is to bring North Korea out of diplomatic isolation—something that is welcome to both China and Russia.

Moscow’s Maghreb Moment

Russia is regaining influence in North Africa thanks to weapons, energy, and trade.

Infrastructure Connectivity and Political Stability in Eurasia

The country’s geographic location largely predetermines its foreign policy, as well as the trajectory of its socioeconomic development. However, even the most negative geographical limitations can be overcome via connectivity and compatibility that are the passport to the success of Eurasian integration.

A Pyrrhic Victory: the History of the Sanctions War Against Iran

The history of sanctions against Iran deserves close analysis in light of the growing sanctions pressure on Russia. Although Iran and Russia are different countries facing different sanctions paradigms, Iran’s experience is meaningful if only because both countries have to contend with US sanction law.