All articles
Fyodor Lukyanov

Fyodor Lukyanov is Editor-in-Chief of Russia in Global Affairs, Chairman of the Presidium of the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy, and Research Director of the Valdai International Discussion Club.

  • 18 december 2006

    Russia Is Not Prepared to Restore the Empire

    When the Baltic countries entered NATO and the European Union a couple of years ago, many thought it was the end of the centuries-old "red line." Euro-Atlantic organizations had crossed into the former Russian and Soviet empires...

  • 29 november 2006

    Russia Is Not Prepared to Restore the Empire

    When the Baltic countries entered NATO and the European Union a couple of years ago, many thought it was the end of the centuries-old "red line." Euro-Atlantic organizations had crossed into the former Russian and Soviet empires.

  • 1 november 2006

    The Deficit of Values Behind a Crisis in Goals

    It is 17 years since the fall of the Berlin wall and 15 years since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Current events in the former "socialist world" show that the scale of difficulties involved in the transition was seriously underestimated...

  • 12 october 2006

    From Nationalism to Nation

    On the eve of the 15th anniversary of the breakup of the Soviet Union, it has become particularly obvious that Russia has not only failed to overcome the consequences of that dramatic event, but has even failed to rethink them.

  • 4 october 2006

    Saakashvili Is Playing a High-Stakes Game

    There are two features of the current crisis between Moscow and Tbilisi that differentiate it from the many difficulties between the two in the past.

  • 12 september 2006

    Old Habits Die Hard

    Everyone agrees that Sept. 11, 2001, changed the world. Much has been said and written about the impact the terrorist attacks had on the United States, how Europe responded and the Middle East was transformed, and about the effect the attacks had on the institutions of international relations in general.

  • 11 july 2006

    The Russian Season

    Russia’s G8 presidency, which will be crowned by the July summit in St. Petersburg, has become the leitmotif of Russia’s foreign policy this year.

  • 8 may 2006

    Unlearned Lessons of the Past

    The arrival of spring was marked by several anniversaries in Russia and the world.

  • 7 february 2006

    After the Empire

    This year will mark 15 years since the breakup of the Soviet Union, a dramatic event whose aftermath will determine the course of world history for a long time.

  • 21 november 2005

    Passions Over Sovereignty

    Of the many subjects of political debate in Russia in 2005, the main emphasis has been on national sovereignty.

  • 30 july 2005

    Debates About Values

    Thirty years ago, on August 1, 1975, the leaders of 35 countries gathered in Helsinki to sign the Final Act of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe.

  • 18 may 2005

    In Search of New Identity

    Russia is marking two anniversaries this spring that are of fundamental importance for its development.

  • 8 february 2005

    The Spiral of Russian History

    The year 2004 has proven to be Russian President Vladimir Putin’s most difficult year since he took office in 2000. Apart from an upsurge in terrorism, which culminated in the horrible terrorist act in Beslan, Putin faced a decrease in economic growth rates, the declining position of Moscow in the post-Soviet space, and a marked deterioration in the West’s attitude toward Moscow.

  • 25 november 2004

    Victorious Ukraine

    The preliminary outcome of the battle shows that Ukraine is a complicated and subtle political system that does not deserve a simplified approach.

  • 9 november 2004

    Russia Goes to War

    Following the recent hostage drama in Beslan, where hundreds of schoolchildren were brutally killed by terrorists, we must ask the question: “What kind of country has Russia become?”

  • 9 november 2004

    Imperial Overload

    The Kremlin has earmarked enormous resources to ensure Viktor Yanukovich’s victory in Ukraine’s presidential election, in order to prove that Russia still has influence in the post-Soviet republic, and not because it would actually benefit from that win.

  • 9 september 2004

    The Eternal Value of Autocracy

    Differences in the interpretation of the Beslan hostage drama by Russia and the West could well drive a wedge between the two sides, reducing relations to their lowest point since the demise of the Soviet empire.

  • 16 august 2004

    No Rose Is Without a Thorn

    There already was a Georgian president who failed to live up to his own popularity and subsequently drove his country into the abyss.

  • 10 august 2004

    Gone with the Wind of Change

    Fifteen years ago, in the early summer of 1989, the entire Soviet nation was glued to the television, not believing its eyes. At that time, the country held its first Congress of People’s Deputies of the Soviet Union, and it was then that public politics first arose in Russia.

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Publisher's column

A Cold War: A Forecast for Tomorrow

Nuclear deterrence is the only reason why the world did not plunge into a nuclear conflict during the Cold War and is not sliding down that path now as we are living through a new Cold War which is even worse than the previous one.

Editor's column

Atlantic Drift: Russia and the U.S.-Europe Divide

Relations between Russia, Europe, and the United States are in flux as none is able or wants to maintain what it once had. An attempt to revive the Cold War paradigm has failed, and a new framework of relations has not formed. This state of uncertainty will most likely endure until each player achieves a measure of domestic stability.


Glocalization: When Globalization Goes Local

Complexity and diversity make the world more stable. A global world with identical political, economic, and any other elements could have more, not less conflict. Globality is getting localized, and locality can be globalized, too. These two trends do not contradict each other: on the contrary, their synthesis is a source of stability.

What Went Wrong with Eurasian Integration and How to Fix It

Current EU developments are an incentive for studying EU experience and reflecting on how to avoid their mistakes. All the more so now that other integration unions, particularly the Eurasian Economic Union, which is most important to Russia, are not making big strides.

Whose Liberal International Order?

The Remaking of Eurasia and the Shifting Balance of International Ideas.

The New Northern Policy and Korean-Russian Cooperation

While the North Korea crisis hangs over regional and global peace, the world calls out to constructive and peaceful cooperation that can halt the ‘conflict spiral’. The Russian-Korean cooperation and Eurasian integration may become a remedy for the problem.

The Soviet Roots of Meddling in U.S. Politics

The release on January 6 of an unclassified version of the U.S. Intelligence Community’s report describing efforts by Russian security services to influence last year’s U.S. presidential campaign in favor of Donald Trump evoked a sense of deja vu.

Turkey and Russia, Erdogan and Putin

By the summer of 2016, it had become relatively commonplace in Western policy circles to wonder if Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan was following in the footsteps of Russian President Vladimir Putin, and, if so, how far down that path he would take Turkey.