All articles
Sergey Karaganov

Sergei Karaganov, Doctor of History, is Dean of the School of World Economics and International Relations at the National Research University–Higher School of Economics. He is also Honorary Chairman of the Presidium of the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy.

  • 7 july 2010

    Global Zero and Common Sense

    The anti-nuclear movement is harmful. Firstly, it may result in the reduction of nuclear armaments to a dangerous minimum, as it opens the Pandora’s Box of negotiations over the reduction of non-strategic nuclear armaments. Secondly, it distracts from the search for new ways of setting peace and stability in the new world.

  • 9 april 2010

    Strategic Havoc

    The world-class strategic players, including the main one – the United States – are getting ever more confused and dismayed as they lose
    the old bearings only to find no new ones.

  • 5 september 2009

    Russia and the U.S.: Reconfiguration, Not Resetting

    It would make sense for Moscow to offer its own package of ideas to Washington regarding the improvement of relations, and this package should be bigger than the one proposed by President Obama. The two countries must take a course towards a “big deal” based on the analysis of vital interests of the sides and their priority ranking. The parties should pledge respect for each other’s interests in the areas where these interests are truly vital, while making concessions on secondary issues.

  • 7 june 2009

    The Magic Numbers of 2009

    The unfinished nature of the Cold War and World War II is creating a dangerous vacuum. If attempts to enlarge NATO persist, Russia may
    turn from a revisionist state changing the disadvantageous rules of the game imposed on it in the 1990s into a revanchist state.

  • 16 november 2008

    The World Crisis – A Time for Creation

    The matter at hand is not just a deep financial and economic crisis. This is an overall crisis of the entire system of global governance; a crisis of ideas on which global development was based; and a crisis of international institutions.

  • 18 november 2007

    A New Epoch of Confrontation

    Many analysts in Moscow argue that the political and propaganda pressure being exerted by the West on Russia is the result of Russia’s growth. But this Western pressure is more of a counterattack against Russia than a direct attack, intended to prevent a further weakening of the West’s positions and possibly win them back. This counterattack is an important constituent feature of a "New Epoch of Confrontation."

  • 28 august 2006

    Goals for Russia

    To begin with, I would like to sum up some developments. It has become obvious that the United States has lost Iraq, and that the situation there is quickly sliding down into a civil war, which will involve adjacent countries.

  • 16 may 2006

    Before the War

    It is unpopular now in most of Europe, including Russia, to cite with approval anything the American president says. In his recent national security strategy, though, he put forward an idea that many of us had thought about but very few of us had dared to pronounce openly.

  • 8 may 2006

    Dangerous Relapses

    Russia has reached a limit in conservative evolution. If we cross
    this line, we will give the “knights and pages” of the Cold War in the West
    an excuse for worsening relations with Russia. These people feel lost; they simply cannot live without an enemy, nor are they able to acknowledge past mistakes.

  • 21 november 2005

    New Contours of the World Order

    The recent changes in the world situation have brought about several historic challenges to Russia, causing it to amend its policy. The rapid redistribution of forces on the world arena in favor of “New Asia” requires that Russia revise its economic and political priorities.

  • 17 february 2004

    Moscow and Tbilisi: Beginning Anew

    The change of power in Tbilisi offers a good opportunity to assess Moscow’s policy toward Georgia and other post-Soviet states. Russia should start pursuing a friendly and indulgent policy toward Georgia, a policy befitting a strong state. Otherwise, the Tbilisi scenario may be repeated in Chisinau, Kiev or Minsk.

  • 17 may 2003

    The Chances and Challenges of the New World

    The 300th anniversary of St. Petersburg provides a historic opportunity for reviewing the record of Russia’s interaction with Europe and the rest of the world. Mapping out approaches to the future is definitely impossible without specific knowledge of the past; it is no less essential that we hold realistic assessments of the world we are now living in

  • 24 march 2003

    Russia, Europe, and New Challenges

    The European Union has still failed to define its new strategy towards Moscow. The EU, by maintaining an arms-length relationship with Russia, is seriously weakening its own international standing, especially while international security and geopolitics are regaining priority status.

Archives
Choose year
Choose issue
Publisher's column

Ideology of Eastward Turn

The first phase of Russia’s turn towards rising Asia is gaining momentum – the Far East’s rate of development is twice the national average.

Editor's column

Trump-Putin meeting in Helsinki might solve Syrian crisis

Russia and the United States have very different approaches and goals in the Middle East, but they could lead to a solution in Syria.


Putin-Trump: the Real Test Will Come in the Implementation Phase After the Summit Is Over

The most likely outcome of the Putin-Trump summit is that both Presidents will declare it a success and agree that their officials will begin work on resolving a number of difficult issues. But the real test will come in the implementation phase after the summit is over.

The Art of Expectation Management

It is evident that Vladimir Putin yearns for a meeting with Donald Trump. He has always desired this meeting — since the day Trump had won the presidential election in November of 2016. The Kremlin would have apparently preferred an early summit to take place in spring of last year.

How to Reduce Nuclear Risks in Helsinki

Presidents Trump and Putin will finally meet next week in Helsinki for a bilateral summit. Throughout the Cold War, summits between US and Soviet leaders were overwhelmingly welcomed in both countries and the world as an opportunity to reduce tensions.

The New Global Governance: Towards a More Sustainable Framework

Faced with threats ranging from climate change to hugely disruptive technological advances, the world is clearly at a crossroads. More than ever a stable, inclusive and global governance is needed.

Infrastructure Connectivity and Political Stability in Eurasia

The country’s geographic location largely predetermines its foreign policy, as well as the trajectory of its socioeconomic development. However, even the most negative geographical limitations can be overcome via connectivity and compatibility that are the passport to the success of Eurasian integration.