All articles
Sergey Karaganov

Sergei Karaganov, Doctor of History, is Dean of the School of World Economics and International Relations at the National Research University–Higher School of Economics. He is also Honorary Chairman of the Presidium of the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy.

  • 28 august 2006

    Goals for Russia

    To begin with, I would like to sum up some developments. It has become obvious that the United States has lost Iraq, and that the situation there is quickly sliding down into a civil war, which will involve adjacent countries.

  • 16 may 2006

    Before the War

    It is unpopular now in most of Europe, including Russia, to cite with approval anything the American president says. In his recent national security strategy, though, he put forward an idea that many of us had thought about but very few of us had dared to pronounce openly.

  • 8 may 2006

    Dangerous Relapses

    Russia has reached a limit in conservative evolution. If we cross
    this line, we will give the “knights and pages” of the Cold War in the West
    an excuse for worsening relations with Russia. These people feel lost; they simply cannot live without an enemy, nor are they able to acknowledge past mistakes.

  • 21 november 2005

    New Contours of the World Order

    The recent changes in the world situation have brought about several historic challenges to Russia, causing it to amend its policy. The rapid redistribution of forces on the world arena in favor of “New Asia” requires that Russia revise its economic and political priorities.

  • 17 february 2004

    Moscow and Tbilisi: Beginning Anew

    The change of power in Tbilisi offers a good opportunity to assess Moscow’s policy toward Georgia and other post-Soviet states. Russia should start pursuing a friendly and indulgent policy toward Georgia, a policy befitting a strong state. Otherwise, the Tbilisi scenario may be repeated in Chisinau, Kiev or Minsk.

  • 17 may 2003

    The Chances and Challenges of the New World

    The 300th anniversary of St. Petersburg provides a historic opportunity for reviewing the record of Russia’s interaction with Europe and the rest of the world. Mapping out approaches to the future is definitely impossible without specific knowledge of the past; it is no less essential that we hold realistic assessments of the world we are now living in

  • 24 march 2003

    Russia, Europe, and New Challenges

    The European Union has still failed to define its new strategy towards Moscow. The EU, by maintaining an arms-length relationship with Russia, is seriously weakening its own international standing, especially while international security and geopolitics are regaining priority status.

Previous issues
Choose year
Choose issue
Publisher's column

Russia’s Victory, new Concert of Nations

Russia was resolved and would win, which it actually did by the beginning of 2016. Threats to tear its economy to tatters and organize regime change either through asphyxiating sanctions, organizing “a conspiracy of oligarchs” or popular discontent have been forgotten.

Editor's column

Here’s Why U.S.-Russia Military Conflict Over Syria Is Looking More And More Likely

To repair his abysmal approval rating, Trump is likely to further intervene in Syria, prompting a dangerous Russian response.


Diplomacy vs. 'hypocrisy' in the post Cold War era

At a roundtable event in Moscow, top experts debated the “hypocritical” and “insincere” foreign policies of both Russia and the West in the post-Cold War era.

In reading Putin, don’t mistake nostalgia for ambition

Vladimir Putin has mentioned several times that the collapse of the Soviet Union was a geopolitical mistake. Although these words were often interpreted as his desire to constitute that country, there is little reason to believe this.

Defense Through Leadership: Turkey on the Eve of Its Constitutional Referendum

The April 16 referendum will focus on power distribution rather than institution building. In other words, the organizers saw it as an opportunity to expand the President’s powers and allow him to rule longer. In their turn, Turks perceived it as an institutional choice to contribute to the development of the state.

Into the Unknown: U.S.-Russian Relations Unhinged

If the larger picture defies prediction, the immediate future is scarcely more transparent. In the U.S. case, the known unknowns are numerous. They begin with the question of how much deck furniture Trump is willing to overturn in order to pursue an “America First” strategy.

Russia’s 2016-2018 Election Cycle: Popular Engagement and Protest Potential

In the wake of the For Fair Elections protest movement in Russia in 2011-2012, the Kremlin initiated a new strategy of state-society relations that was aimed at diminishing the propensity for protest in the next election cycle.

Lukashenko’s “Drift To The West”: Why Moscow Should Not Be Worried

Belarus’ traditional structural dependence on Russia is increasing, and Minsk’s freedom of maneuver continues to shrink.