All articles
Sergey Karaganov

Sergei Karaganov, Doctor of History, is Dean of the School of World Economics and International Relations at the National Research University–Higher School of Economics. He is also Honorary Chairman of the Presidium of the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy.

  • 18 november 2007

    A New Epoch of Confrontation

    Many analysts in Moscow argue that the political and propaganda pressure being exerted by the West on Russia is the result of Russia’s growth. But this Western pressure is more of a counterattack against Russia than a direct attack, intended to prevent a further weakening of the West’s positions and possibly win them back. This counterattack is an important constituent feature of a "New Epoch of Confrontation."

  • 28 august 2006

    Goals for Russia

    To begin with, I would like to sum up some developments. It has become obvious that the United States has lost Iraq, and that the situation there is quickly sliding down into a civil war, which will involve adjacent countries.

  • 16 may 2006

    Before the War

    It is unpopular now in most of Europe, including Russia, to cite with approval anything the American president says. In his recent national security strategy, though, he put forward an idea that many of us had thought about but very few of us had dared to pronounce openly.

  • 8 may 2006

    Dangerous Relapses

    Russia has reached a limit in conservative evolution. If we cross
    this line, we will give the “knights and pages” of the Cold War in the West
    an excuse for worsening relations with Russia. These people feel lost; they simply cannot live without an enemy, nor are they able to acknowledge past mistakes.

  • 21 november 2005

    New Contours of the World Order

    The recent changes in the world situation have brought about several historic challenges to Russia, causing it to amend its policy. The rapid redistribution of forces on the world arena in favor of “New Asia” requires that Russia revise its economic and political priorities.

  • 17 february 2004

    Moscow and Tbilisi: Beginning Anew

    The change of power in Tbilisi offers a good opportunity to assess Moscow’s policy toward Georgia and other post-Soviet states. Russia should start pursuing a friendly and indulgent policy toward Georgia, a policy befitting a strong state. Otherwise, the Tbilisi scenario may be repeated in Chisinau, Kiev or Minsk.

  • 17 may 2003

    The Chances and Challenges of the New World

    The 300th anniversary of St. Petersburg provides a historic opportunity for reviewing the record of Russia’s interaction with Europe and the rest of the world. Mapping out approaches to the future is definitely impossible without specific knowledge of the past; it is no less essential that we hold realistic assessments of the world we are now living in

  • 24 march 2003

    Russia, Europe, and New Challenges

    The European Union has still failed to define its new strategy towards Moscow. The EU, by maintaining an arms-length relationship with Russia, is seriously weakening its own international standing, especially while international security and geopolitics are regaining priority status.

Previous issues
Choose year
Choose issue
Publisher's column

Russia’s Victory, new Concert of Nations

Russia was resolved and would win, which it actually did by the beginning of 2016. Threats to tear its economy to tatters and organize regime change either through asphyxiating sanctions, organizing “a conspiracy of oligarchs” or popular discontent have been forgotten.

Editor's column

Atlantic Drift: Russia and the U.S.-Europe Divide

Relations between Russia, Europe, and the United States are in flux as none is able or wants to maintain what it once had. An attempt to revive the Cold War paradigm has failed, and a new framework of relations has not formed. This state of uncertainty will most likely endure until each player achieves a measure of domestic stability.


Egoistic Hegemonism

The never-ending political infighting in the US could be viewed as an inevitable stage in an overly complex path the US must take to find its place in the world, one that is changing in spite of what the US wants or thinks. On the other hand, these political struggles make it even harder and more painful for the US and for the rest of the world to adapt to these changes.

Priorities of the EAEU: Development of the Internal Market and Free Trade Agreements

On Wednesday, October 11, a meeting of the Supreme Eurasian Economic Council takes place in Sochi with the participation of the presidents of Eurasian Economic Union countries.

The Arctic In An Age Of Geopolitical Change: Assessment And Recommendations

Arctic remains one of the world’s last great, pristine and undeveloped areas. Equivalent to one-sixth of the world’s landmass, the region is home to just 4 million people. The region is rich in both renewable and non-renewable resources.

Great Power Interventions and the Future of Responsibility to Protect

It may often seem that a whole epoch has passed since the Kosovo Commission’s oft-cited conclusion that the NATO intervention into Yugoslavia in 1999 was “illegal, but legitimate”.

Turkey and Russia, Erdogan and Putin

By the summer of 2016, it had become relatively commonplace in Western policy circles to wonder if Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan was following in the footsteps of Russian President Vladimir Putin, and, if so, how far down that path he would take Turkey.

The Need to Massage Egos: Status Politics as a Crucial Element of US-Russia Relations

Despite multiple official declarations of non-adversarial intentions issued by the United States and Russia over the past quarter-century, both sides have been unable to avoid repeated bouts of conflict escalation.