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Vladimir Orlov

Vladimir Orlov is the founder and now Special Advisor at the PIR Center (Russian Center for Policy Studies); Director of the Center for Global Trends and International Organizations at the Diplomatic Academy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation; member of the UN Secretary General’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters. He participated in the NPT Review Conferences of 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015.

  • 22 september 2015

    The Glass Menagerie of Non-Proliferation

    There is no doubt that the international nuclear non-proliferation regime entered a new phase in May 2015. The situation has worsened, and it will be more and more difficult and expensive to correct it. The cooling of international relations will make the NPT situation extremely fragile.

  • 30 june 2013

    Life After Death

    Nunn-Lugar should be replaced with a new Russian-American program that should involve fewer projects and less funding. Let us call it New Partnership. Its main principle should be equality, rather than patronizing through money infusions from donors.

  • 25 march 2012

    A Labyrinth with No Walls

    Russia should step over its prejudices and take a look at today’s Iran as its serious and long-term partner in the region – not at the declarative level, but at the level of action. Such attempts have been made from time to time, but now and then they are interrupted – out of the wrong fear to anger the Americans.

  • 29 december 2011

    Russia’s Nuclear Quest Comes Full Circle

    Russia should rethink what it has inherited from the Soviet Union in nuclear matters, the role of nuclear weapons, and their relevance in the future. Furthermore, Russia should consider how it can best use to its own advantage the opportunities offered by the nuclear non-proliferation regime, and how this regime can be modified to meet the realities of the new century.

  • 16 october 2010

    NPT of Tomorrow

    The success of the 2010 NPT Review Conference is a step forward towards strengthening the international nuclear non-proliferation regime. Although it is a modest step, it is nonetheless significant, as it has reaffirmed the vitality and viability of the NPT.

  • 16 september 2003

    Patient in Coma?

    The Iraqi crisis has inflicted serious damage on the principles of non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The very word ‘non-proliferation’ has become hackneyed, while the traditional mechanisms for preventing the WMD proliferation are being ignored – not because they are inefficient but because they can lay bare an easy substitution; the established non-proliferation architecture is being deliberately jeopardized.

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Publisher's column

Russia’s Victory, new Concert of Nations

Russia was resolved and would win, which it actually did by the beginning of 2016. Threats to tear its economy to tatters and organize regime change either through asphyxiating sanctions, organizing “a conspiracy of oligarchs” or popular discontent have been forgotten.

Editor's column

Trump’s Foreign Policy Is ‘Buy American’ — Become An Ally By Becoming A Client

The rest, including political initiatives and even military force, seem for Trump to serve only as means to achieve commercial ends.


Will Iran Leave the Nuclear Deal?

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said on Tuesday that Iran could break the JCPOA nuclear agreement if Washington imposes new sanctions against Tehran.

In Search of Russian Meddling

The Washington Post published an article on contacts between a member of Donald Trump’s campaign headquarters and the Russian International Affairs Council.

A Tranquilizer With a Scent of Gunpowder. The Balance between Russian and NATO Forces in Eastern Europe after 2014

The serious decline in Russia’s relations with the West has breathed a new life into NATO, which returned to its traditional role, the containment of Russia.

A Cyber Revolt in the Making

Regular news reports on cyberattacks, information leaks, hacking and their political consequences have been dominating the headlines. Cyberspace turned out to be an efficient means to bring people together and to exert their will, which governments have to reckon with.

Turkey and Russia, Erdogan and Putin

By the summer of 2016, it had become relatively commonplace in Western policy circles to wonder if Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan was following in the footsteps of Russian President Vladimir Putin, and, if so, how far down that path he would take Turkey.

The Need to Massage Egos: Status Politics as a Crucial Element of US-Russia Relations

Despite multiple official declarations of non-adversarial intentions issued by the United States and Russia over the past quarter-century, both sides have been unable to avoid repeated bouts of conflict escalation.