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Alexander Lomanov

Alexander Lomanov is Chief Researcher at the Institute of Far Eastern Studies, Russian Academy of Sciences; he holds a Doctorate in History.

  • 20 june 2018

    Not to Disappear One by One

    Vladimir Putin’s visit to China and the simultaneous G7 summit in Canada created an unprecedentedly hard background for comparison. The US president’s public denunciation of his Western allies and his refusal to sign the G7 summit’s final statement have only emphasized the stability and promise of Russian-Chinese cooperation.

  • 7 march 2018

    Xi Jinping: An Unconstrained President

    In March 2018, the National People’s Congress of China will vote for a number of amendments to the constitution, most importantly the proposal to drop the two-term limit on the presidency and vice-presidency.

  • 17 june 2016

    Supply-Side Reform, Chinese Style

    The proclaimed supply-side structural reform is not a carbon copy of Reagan’s policy. Rather, it is the continuation of the search for the Chinese way of development and efforts to adapt foreign teachings to Chinese conditions.

  • 16 november 2008

    Multipolar Hegemony

    If the hypothetical Sino-American alliance expands beyond the economic framework and takes on a political dimension, this may motivate Europe to expand the geopolitical base by forging a union with Russia.

  • 15 june 2008

    Transition Without a Destination

    Russia and China have vehemently rejected the model of external “management by objectives.” They have been quite successful in effectuating a “transition without a destination” or, in other words, a type of transformation that does not envision a merger with already existing organizations on terms set forth by the latter.

  • 24 march 2003

    The Red Book of Change

    At the beginning of the 21st century, the ‘Celestial Empire’ entered a period of unprecedented prosperity and unshakeable stability. A statement to this effect was made at the 16th National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party, which was held in the autumn of 2002. This document has had a great impact on life in China. However, in the near future China is likely to face some serious challenges, and the outcomes of these are presently difficult to predict.

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Publisher's column

Ideology of Eastward Turn

The first phase of Russia’s turn towards rising Asia is gaining momentum – the Far East’s rate of development is twice the national average.

Editor's column

Trump-Putin meeting in Helsinki might solve Syrian crisis

Russia and the United States have very different approaches and goals in the Middle East, but they could lead to a solution in Syria.


Putin-Trump: the Real Test Will Come in the Implementation Phase After the Summit Is Over

The most likely outcome of the Putin-Trump summit is that both Presidents will declare it a success and agree that their officials will begin work on resolving a number of difficult issues. But the real test will come in the implementation phase after the summit is over.

The Art of Expectation Management

It is evident that Vladimir Putin yearns for a meeting with Donald Trump. He has always desired this meeting — since the day Trump had won the presidential election in November of 2016. The Kremlin would have apparently preferred an early summit to take place in spring of last year.

How to Reduce Nuclear Risks in Helsinki

Presidents Trump and Putin will finally meet next week in Helsinki for a bilateral summit. Throughout the Cold War, summits between US and Soviet leaders were overwhelmingly welcomed in both countries and the world as an opportunity to reduce tensions.

The New Global Governance: Towards a More Sustainable Framework

Faced with threats ranging from climate change to hugely disruptive technological advances, the world is clearly at a crossroads. More than ever a stable, inclusive and global governance is needed.

Infrastructure Connectivity and Political Stability in Eurasia

The country’s geographic location largely predetermines its foreign policy, as well as the trajectory of its socioeconomic development. However, even the most negative geographical limitations can be overcome via connectivity and compatibility that are the passport to the success of Eurasian integration.