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Vladimir Portyakov

Vladimir Portyakov is Deputy Director of the Institute of Far Eastern Studies, Russian Academy of Sciences. He holds a Doctorate in Economics.

  • 23 september 2014

    China’s Rise: What Next?

    In 2021 Russian-Chinese Treaty on Good-Neighborliness and Friendly Cooperation may be not just extended but transformed into a format that would be close to an alliance. So, Russia’s equidistance from the United States and China in the geopolitical triangle is hardly possible in the foreseeable future.

  • 8 may 2006

    Russia, China and India in the World Economy

    The benefits of more active trilateral cooperation outweigh the possible handicaps. Reinvigorated cooperation will furnish each country with levers for beefing up their individual and collective positions within the global economic system.

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Publisher's column

Russia’s Victory, new Concert of Nations

Russia was resolved and would win, which it actually did by the beginning of 2016. Threats to tear its economy to tatters and organize regime change either through asphyxiating sanctions, organizing “a conspiracy of oligarchs” or popular discontent have been forgotten.

Editor's column

Here’s Why U.S.-Russia Military Conflict Over Syria Is Looking More And More Likely

To repair his abysmal approval rating, Trump is likely to further intervene in Syria, prompting a dangerous Russian response.


Diplomacy vs. 'hypocrisy' in the post Cold War era

At a roundtable event in Moscow, top experts debated the “hypocritical” and “insincere” foreign policies of both Russia and the West in the post-Cold War era.

In reading Putin, don’t mistake nostalgia for ambition

Vladimir Putin has mentioned several times that the collapse of the Soviet Union was a geopolitical mistake. Although these words were often interpreted as his desire to constitute that country, there is little reason to believe this.

Defense Through Leadership: Turkey on the Eve of Its Constitutional Referendum

The April 16 referendum will focus on power distribution rather than institution building. In other words, the organizers saw it as an opportunity to expand the President’s powers and allow him to rule longer. In their turn, Turks perceived it as an institutional choice to contribute to the development of the state.

Into the Unknown: U.S.-Russian Relations Unhinged

If the larger picture defies prediction, the immediate future is scarcely more transparent. In the U.S. case, the known unknowns are numerous. They begin with the question of how much deck furniture Trump is willing to overturn in order to pursue an “America First” strategy.

Russia’s 2016-2018 Election Cycle: Popular Engagement and Protest Potential

In the wake of the For Fair Elections protest movement in Russia in 2011-2012, the Kremlin initiated a new strategy of state-society relations that was aimed at diminishing the propensity for protest in the next election cycle.

Lukashenko’s “Drift To The West”: Why Moscow Should Not Be Worried

Belarus’ traditional structural dependence on Russia is increasing, and Minsk’s freedom of maneuver continues to shrink.