All articles
Sergei Dubinin

Sergei Dubinin is a Professor and has a Doctoral Degree in Economics.

  • 25 december 2017

    Breaking Out of the Vicious Circle

    Everything seems to have changed in Russia over the past one hundred years. The social and economic systems were scrapped and built anew twice, and the political system was overhauled three times. Yet the answers to the main questions “Who is to blame?” and “What is to be done?” remain pretty much the same as before.

  • 15 april 2013

    And Still It Turns – Around Money

    (1)

    It is the common wealth, or the accumulated and permanently growing public wealth that has real significance. A growing national economy as such is a factor of attraction. Broadening markets promise lucrative contracts to any economic partner.

  • 27 december 2012

    Shaky Stability

    The Russian economy’s preparedness for the world economic growth slowdown cannot be rated on the basis of the reserves accumulated by the state. A reliable mechanism of generating savings and transforming them into investments and competitive projects in the national economy is a vital need.

  • 24 september 2011

    Time for Financial Repression

    (1)

    The Russian authorities have succeeded in easing the consequences of the economic and financial crisis of 2008-2009 for the population. At the same time, the crisis has exposed structural weaknesses of the Russian economy. The stabilization of economic growth and revenue in the first decade of the 21st cen- tury did not lay the groundwork for long-term development.

  • 15 october 2010

    Together But Not In Sync

    The developing economies are prepared to join the ranks of key players on the financial markets by strengthening their national market infrastructures; that is, by setting up new financial centers on the basis of their banking systems and stock exchanges, and by diversifying debt securities markets. Shanghai, Dubai and Moscow are new generation centers, to name just a few.

  • 16 november 2008

    A New Entente

    The time has come to discuss methods of international regulation. From an objective point of view, the United States, in crisis conditions, should not be interested in stepping up military-political competition in the world arena, but in productive cooperation, including with Russia.

  • 7 february 2006

    The Fruits of a Hundred Years Revolution

    Chaos, as a general rule, occurs in the most authoritarian overcentralized states, in which the breakdown of central authority causes the collapse of local authority. This pattern is observed in the early 20th century both in the Russian and Chinese Empires; the juggernaut of state administration weakens and literally falls to pieces.

1
Archives
Choose year
Choose issue
Publisher's column

How to Win a Cold War

It is about time to draft a truly new foreign policy concept as the previous narrative has exhausted itself, being more of a ritual than a guide to action. Russia needs “strategic patience” as never before.

Editor's column

Russia-Japan -- peace can wait

Putin has snubbed Abe as he boosts links with China amid growing US hostility to Beijing and Moscow.


Mistakes in Syria Are Inevitable

Syria continues to be the key newsmaker when it comes to the international agenda. With the breakthrough agreement between Russia and Turkey and the recent downing of the Russian plane, the situation offers more questions than answers and remains the matter of the biggest concern.

Where Is the West As Endgame in Syria Looms?

It is high time that the US, and especially the UK, accepted that their war in Syria has been lost – or at least that their original objective, the removal of Bashar al-Assad has not been achieved. Are they prepared to pursue the fight now at the expense of Idlib’s 3 million civilians?

Boosting the USE of national currencies among BRICS

The use of national currencies among developing countries is acquiring increasing importance as the developing economies are building their own development banks and integration platforms against the backdrop of rising protectionist pressures in the developed world.

US Indo-Pacific Strategy: Myths and Reality

Facing its ‘most dynamic and formidable competitor in modern history’, Washington increasingly does away with hopeful thinking and seeks new approaches towards Asia. It raised the concept of the Indo-Pacific region. But what strategy is behind this buzzword? And what does it mean for Asia?

The New Global Governance: Towards a More Sustainable Framework

Faced with threats ranging from climate change to hugely disruptive technological advances, the world is clearly at a crossroads. More than ever a stable, inclusive and global governance is needed.