All articles
Sergei Dubinin

Sergei Dubinin is a Professor and has a Doctoral Degree in Economics.

  • 25 december 2017

    Breaking Out of the Vicious Circle

    Everything seems to have changed in Russia over the past one hundred years. The social and economic systems were scrapped and built anew twice, and the political system was overhauled three times. Yet the answers to the main questions “Who is to blame?” and “What is to be done?” remain pretty much the same as before.

  • 15 april 2013

    And Still It Turns – Around Money


    It is the common wealth, or the accumulated and permanently growing public wealth that has real significance. A growing national economy as such is a factor of attraction. Broadening markets promise lucrative contracts to any economic partner.

  • 27 december 2012

    Shaky Stability

    The Russian economy’s preparedness for the world economic growth slowdown cannot be rated on the basis of the reserves accumulated by the state. A reliable mechanism of generating savings and transforming them into investments and competitive projects in the national economy is a vital need.

  • 24 september 2011

    Time for Financial Repression


    The Russian authorities have succeeded in easing the consequences of the economic and financial crisis of 2008-2009 for the population. At the same time, the crisis has exposed structural weaknesses of the Russian economy. The stabilization of economic growth and revenue in the first decade of the 21st cen- tury did not lay the groundwork for long-term development.

  • 15 october 2010

    Together But Not In Sync

    The developing economies are prepared to join the ranks of key players on the financial markets by strengthening their national market infrastructures; that is, by setting up new financial centers on the basis of their banking systems and stock exchanges, and by diversifying debt securities markets. Shanghai, Dubai and Moscow are new generation centers, to name just a few.

  • 16 november 2008

    A New Entente

    The time has come to discuss methods of international regulation. From an objective point of view, the United States, in crisis conditions, should not be interested in stepping up military-political competition in the world arena, but in productive cooperation, including with Russia.

  • 7 february 2006

    The Fruits of a Hundred Years Revolution

    Chaos, as a general rule, occurs in the most authoritarian overcentralized states, in which the breakdown of central authority causes the collapse of local authority. This pattern is observed in the early 20th century both in the Russian and Chinese Empires; the juggernaut of state administration weakens and literally falls to pieces.

Previous issues
Choose year
Choose issue
Publisher's column

‘China and Russia are quasi allies … On strategic affairs Russia and India have serious conversations only at top level’

"Our most important foreign priority would be keeping peace in the world – very important for Russia, and also because the global situation is worse than at any time in decades."

Editor's column

WEF-2018: Everybody First

If America, with its power, influence, capabilities and share in the world economy proclaims itself "First", it thereby sets the tone. So everyone will have to follow it and also to become "first of all." It's hardly worth to be glad about it. But we must be ready.

Four Years Since Maidan: Why Russia-West Reconciliation Will Remain Crucial During Putin’s Fourth Term

In early 2018, a remarkable milestone was reached in post-Cold War history: as of February 5, the Berlin Wall had officially been down for as long as it was up. But in contrast to the jubilance and optimism that surrounded the fall of communism, today is characterized by growing mistrust and even open hostility between Moscow and Western capitals as we appear to be further away from the promise made in 1989 by President George H. W. Bush of a “Europe whole and free.”

What Сan Britain Do in Response to Russian Nerve Attack?

The UK Government has concluded "it is highly likely that Russia was responsible" for a “brazen attempt to murder innocent civilians on our soil,” Theresa May told the Commons on Monday after a nerve agent was used on Sergei Skripal and his daughter in Salisbury.

The Russian Revolution of 1917: History, Memory, and Politics

In 100 years since the Revolution of 1917, it continues to have impact on the Russian society. Divergent assessments of the Revolution and different approaches to its commemoration have been sparking off heated debates on Russia’s past and future that emphasize the need to reconcile different narratives.

The Global Resurgence of Economic Nationalism

Against a background of shifting geoeconomic power from the West to the East, economic nationalism has become the development strategy that allows rising powers to reverse negative asymmetry in interdependent economic relationships.

Conditionality Beyond Sanctions

Identifying and Pursuing Interests in the EU-Russia Relationship.

The Demise of Ukraine’s “Eurasian Vector” and the Rise of Pro-NATO Sentiment

Before 2014, the majority of Ukrainians did not view the goal of European integration as a “national idea.” Even so, most Ukrainians had positive views about developing relations with and integrating into the EU.