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Vladimir Mau

Vladimir Mau is Rector of the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.

  • 20 june 2018

    Putin’s Economic Dilemma

    Despite Western sanctions and oil-price volatility, Russia is currently on sturdier economic footing than most of its critics ever could have imagined just a few years ago. But while prudent fiscal and monetary policies have laid the groundwork for long-term sustainable growth, the government must resist the temptation of short-term stimulus.

  • 25 september 2014

    Russia needs reforms, not a sanctions war

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    Mutual sanctions are always extremely unpleasant, and the application of sanctions and the “hot” trade war between Russia, Europe and the United States can have no good result.

  • 8 march 2009

    The Global Crisis As Seen from Russia

    It has become popular in Russia to speak about the crash of the Western economic model and liberal capitalism and this talk may make some sense from the political point of view. All of economic history shows that however harsh a crisis may be and whatever stage of capitalism’s decomposition is attributed to it, market economies have always survived crises, and emerged from them stronger, tougher and more competitive.

  • 10 february 2007

    Strengths and Weaknesses of the Russian Economy

    Russia entered its postindustrial transformation much later than the West. In fact, we must choose an effective model of a postindustrial market and produce a set of state policy instruments that will ensure its proper functioning.

  • 8 may 2006

    Russia’s Economic Policy – Setting Priorities

    The full-scale revolution that Russia experienced while implementing the systemic post-Communist transformation is over, and the basic state institutions have been restored. At the same time, the elites have not consolidated much, and a stable national consensus on basic values has not been reached.

  • 30 july 2005

    Lessons of the Spanish Empire

    A reliance on natural resources in a country’s development causes grave economic problems and results in the government’s awkward decisions. The instances can be easily found in recent and distant history.

  • 18 may 2005

    Perestroika Through the Prism of History

    Debates about perestroika in Russia seem destined to remain “What if” controversies. Whatever aspects of this period are being discussed, an intriguing question always stands out, explicitly or implicitly: Could the events have taken a different course? Or was it spurred by an accidental concourse of circumstances, mistakes and spontaneous whims of certain leaders?

  • 10 august 2004

    The Logic of Russian Transition

    It could be persuasively argued that the goals of the post-Communist transformation have been successfully accomplished. The dominant socio-economic problems confronting Russia today are the crisis of the industrial system and the establishment of the socio-economic foundation of a post-industrial society.

  • 18 february 2004

    Politics vs Economics

    If we were to make a brief summary of the year 2003 for Russia, here is what it would entail: an overall favorable economic situation; general economic growth; changes in the political atmosphere which were manifest in the campaign against the YUKOS oil company and parliamentary election results; preparations for the presidential election and debates over what political and economic policies Vladimir Putin may pursue during his second presidency. Last year’s results are worthy of an in-depth analysis, as many of those events will clearly mark out a course for the coming years.

  • 16 june 2003

    The Dangers of Restructuring Economies with ’Cheap Money’

    Following the collapse of Communism, Central and East European nations and the countries of the former Soviet Union became a kind of proving ground for international aid efforts. The lessons of the 1990s have produced new evidence confirming that ‘cheap money’ allocated by developed nations and international financial institutions is inefficient.

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Russia-Japan -- peace can wait

Putin has snubbed Abe as he boosts links with China amid growing US hostility to Beijing and Moscow.


On Russia’s Power: is Winter Coming?

On November 11–12, 2018, Abu Dhabi hosted the fifth annual expert meeting within the strategic dialog organized by Emirates Policy Center with the support of the UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Mapping Global Strategic Stability in the Twenty-First Century

The U.S.-Russia strategic relationship—the only one to have featured strategic arms control—is no longer central to global strategic stability.

Anti-Russia Sanctions: A Fall Lull?

After the high-profile events of August, an unusual lull befell the battlefields of the sanctions war. The sanctions have ceased for the time being to be a direct cause of volatility in the stock market and foreign exchange markets.

Islam and Global Commons: The Gap between Principles and Practices

It is estimated that there are approximately 1.6 billion Muslims in the world today, who represent over 20% of the world’s population. No one is exempt from the vagaries of climate change, and Muslims have to accept their share of the responsibility.

The Summit in Singapore and the Failure of Donald Trump’s Diplomacy

It seemed before the Singapore summit, - the meeting of the leaders of the US and North Korea, which was drawing attention of the whole international community while being prepared, that Donald Trump’s “blackmail diplomacy” proved its effectiveness. However, is it possible to consider his policy towards Pyongyang and his administration’s foreign policy a success?