All articles
Vladimir Mau
  • 25 september 2014

    Russia needs reforms, not a sanctions war

    (1)

    Mutual sanctions are always extremely unpleasant, and the application of sanctions and the “hot” trade war between Russia, Europe and the United States can have no good result.

  • 8 march 2009

    The Global Crisis As Seen from Russia

    It has become popular in Russia to speak about the crash of the Western economic model and liberal capitalism and this talk may make some sense from the political point of view. All of economic history shows that however harsh a crisis may be and whatever stage of capitalism’s decomposition is attributed to it, market economies have always survived crises, and emerged from them stronger, tougher and more competitive.

  • 10 february 2007

    Strengths and Weaknesses of the Russian Economy

    Russia entered its postindustrial transformation much later than the West. In fact, we must choose an effective model of a postindustrial market and produce a set of state policy instruments that will ensure its proper functioning.

  • 8 may 2006

    Russia’s Economic Policy – Setting Priorities

    The full-scale revolution that Russia experienced while implementing the systemic post-Communist transformation is over, and the basic state institutions have been restored. At the same time, the elites have not consolidated much, and a stable national consensus on basic values has not been reached.

  • 30 july 2005

    Lessons of the Spanish Empire

    A reliance on natural resources in a country’s development causes grave economic problems and results in the government’s awkward decisions. The instances can be easily found in recent and distant history.

  • 18 may 2005

    Perestroika Through the Prism of History

    Debates about perestroika in Russia seem destined to remain “What if” controversies. Whatever aspects of this period are being discussed, an intriguing question always stands out, explicitly or implicitly: Could the events have taken a different course? Or was it spurred by an accidental concourse of circumstances, mistakes and spontaneous whims of certain leaders?

  • 10 august 2004

    The Logic of Russian Transition

    It could be persuasively argued that the goals of the post-Communist transformation have been successfully accomplished. The dominant socio-economic problems confronting Russia today are the crisis of the industrial system and the establishment of the socio-economic foundation of a post-industrial society.

  • 18 february 2004

    Politics vs Economics

    If we were to make a brief summary of the year 2003 for Russia, here is what it would entail: an overall favorable economic situation; general economic growth; changes in the political atmosphere which were manifest in the campaign against the YUKOS oil company and parliamentary election results; preparations for the presidential election and debates over what political and economic policies Vladimir Putin may pursue during his second presidency. Last year’s results are worthy of an in-depth analysis, as many of those events will clearly mark out a course for the coming years.

  • 16 june 2003

    The Dangers of Restructuring Economies with ’Cheap Money’

    Following the collapse of Communism, Central and East European nations and the countries of the former Soviet Union became a kind of proving ground for international aid efforts. The lessons of the 1990s have produced new evidence confirming that ‘cheap money’ allocated by developed nations and international financial institutions is inefficient.

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Publisher's column

Russia’s Victory, new Concert of Nations

Russia was resolved and would win, which it actually did by the beginning of 2016. Threats to tear its economy to tatters and organize regime change either through asphyxiating sanctions, organizing “a conspiracy of oligarchs” or popular discontent have been forgotten.

Editor's column

Atlantic Drift: Russia and the U.S.-Europe Divide

Relations between Russia, Europe, and the United States are in flux as none is able or wants to maintain what it once had. An attempt to revive the Cold War paradigm has failed, and a new framework of relations has not formed. This state of uncertainty will most likely endure until each player achieves a measure of domestic stability.


Egoistic Hegemonism

The never-ending political infighting in the US could be viewed as an inevitable stage in an overly complex path the US must take to find its place in the world, one that is changing in spite of what the US wants or thinks. On the other hand, these political struggles make it even harder and more painful for the US and for the rest of the world to adapt to these changes.

Priorities of the EAEU: Development of the Internal Market and Free Trade Agreements

On Wednesday, October 11, a meeting of the Supreme Eurasian Economic Council takes place in Sochi with the participation of the presidents of Eurasian Economic Union countries.

The Arctic In An Age Of Geopolitical Change: Assessment And Recommendations

Arctic remains one of the world’s last great, pristine and undeveloped areas. Equivalent to one-sixth of the world’s landmass, the region is home to just 4 million people. The region is rich in both renewable and non-renewable resources.

Great Power Interventions and the Future of Responsibility to Protect

It may often seem that a whole epoch has passed since the Kosovo Commission’s oft-cited conclusion that the NATO intervention into Yugoslavia in 1999 was “illegal, but legitimate”.

Turkey and Russia, Erdogan and Putin

By the summer of 2016, it had become relatively commonplace in Western policy circles to wonder if Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan was following in the footsteps of Russian President Vladimir Putin, and, if so, how far down that path he would take Turkey.

The Need to Massage Egos: Status Politics as a Crucial Element of US-Russia Relations

Despite multiple official declarations of non-adversarial intentions issued by the United States and Russia over the past quarter-century, both sides have been unable to avoid repeated bouts of conflict escalation.