All articles
Igor Zevelev

Igor Zevelev is Doctor of Political Science.

  • 27 december 2012

    A New Realism for the 21st Century

    Maintaining a balance between the Euro-Atlantic vector and the Asian-Pacific vector of Russian foreign policy should not be a game of U-turns one way or the other, but should rather be characterized by flexibility and readiness to adapt to a rapidly changing world.

  • 20 december 2009

    Russia’s Future: Nation or Civilization?

    To build a real civic identity, a nation must have legitimate and, desirably, historically grounded borders, as well as stable and effective state institutions. The all-Russian nation within the present borders of the Russian Federation is young, unstable and weak. Regular elections, political parties, common social and economic problems, and politics could gradually become a shell for a new political nation.

  • 2 march 2008

    Russia’s Policy Toward Compatriots in the Former Soviet Union

    The official attitude of Moscow toward Russians outside the Russian Federation after the disintegration of the Soviet Union shows quite clearly the victory of pragmatism over the phantoms of imperial heritage. Yet the political rhetoric concerning this issue often has a neo-imperialist tone. It plays a compensatory role in the national consciousness and lays foundations for more resolute actions in the future.

  • 17 november 2007

    Russia and China in the Mirror of U.S. Policies

    Russia could learn from the Chinese the intricate overtones of public diplomacy, even though it recognizes its own difference as a political player. Beijing skillfully lifts its partners’ concerns over the growth of China’s economic and military capability, and persistently profiles itself as a friendly country that is trying to build a harmonious world.

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Publisher's column

Ideology of Eastward Turn

The first phase of Russia’s turn towards rising Asia is gaining momentum – the Far East’s rate of development is twice the national average.

Editor's column

Trump-Putin meeting in Helsinki might solve Syrian crisis

Russia and the United States have very different approaches and goals in the Middle East, but they could lead to a solution in Syria.


Putin-Trump: the Real Test Will Come in the Implementation Phase After the Summit Is Over

The most likely outcome of the Putin-Trump summit is that both Presidents will declare it a success and agree that their officials will begin work on resolving a number of difficult issues. But the real test will come in the implementation phase after the summit is over.

The Art of Expectation Management

It is evident that Vladimir Putin yearns for a meeting with Donald Trump. He has always desired this meeting — since the day Trump had won the presidential election in November of 2016. The Kremlin would have apparently preferred an early summit to take place in spring of last year.

How to Reduce Nuclear Risks in Helsinki

Presidents Trump and Putin will finally meet next week in Helsinki for a bilateral summit. Throughout the Cold War, summits between US and Soviet leaders were overwhelmingly welcomed in both countries and the world as an opportunity to reduce tensions.

The New Global Governance: Towards a More Sustainable Framework

Faced with threats ranging from climate change to hugely disruptive technological advances, the world is clearly at a crossroads. More than ever a stable, inclusive and global governance is needed.

Infrastructure Connectivity and Political Stability in Eurasia

The country’s geographic location largely predetermines its foreign policy, as well as the trajectory of its socioeconomic development. However, even the most negative geographical limitations can be overcome via connectivity and compatibility that are the passport to the success of Eurasian integration.