All articles
Anatoly Vishnevsky

Anatoly Vishnevsky is Director of the Institute of Demography of the State University- Higher School of Economics. He holds a Doctorate in Economics.

  • 30 june 2013

    Myths and Realities

    Rejection of anti-migrant mythology should not lead to an underestimation of the risks associated with migration, but help develop a sober constructive policy that would minimize migration risks and maximize its benefits.

  • 2 march 2008

    Multipolarity and Demography

    An excessive rapprochement with growing China, which lacks resources of its own, may impose “allied obligations” on Russia, which can ultimately result in the limitation of its rights to its own resources and to territories where they are located. Moscow will be able to successfully defend its interests only by relying on the solidarity of countries of the North, which are in the same demographic boat with it.

  • 8 may 2006

    Modernization and Counter-Modernization in Russia

    The Soviet political shell has been crushed, but Russia is still wandering around amidst the scattered fragments of that shell, which remain hopeful that they will be put together again some day. They are hoping for a counter-modernization union, albeit with a non-Communist configuration.

  • 18 may 2005

    The Specter of Immigration


    In spite of all of its risks and challenges, immigration offers Russia a chance to survive and to carry out a kind of peaceful expansion. A strategy of diehard anti-immigration isolationism, on the other hand, will lead it nowhere.

  • 16 september 2003

    The Depopulated Superpower

    The dramatic demographic changes in the world are creating an unprecedented challenge for all states, yet the problems confronting Russia, a country with a low birth rate and a very high death rate, are particularly acute.
    Their solution will require a revision of many traditional views; however, neither the nation nor its leaders are prepared for that.

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Publisher's column

How the World Looks From the Russian Perspective

In the future, a duumvirate may emerge in Central Asia, in which China will provide investment and resources, and Russia will contribute security and geopolitical stability.

Editor's column

Big 20 to Big Game: Power Politics Are Returning, Which Suits Russia

The G20 meeting in China was a milestone in international relations. Until only recently, world leaders were certain that the global economy and increased connectivity had helped stabilize and define the new world order. Now, however, the pendulum has turned back towards a classic game between the great powers, and Russia is again feeling right in its element.

Are China and Russia Partnering to Create an Axis?

After experiencing many ups and downs in their relationship, China and Russia have forged a strategic partnership since the advent of the 21st century. While Russia's relations with the United States and the European Union have hit a rough patch, its ties with China are on an upward trend.

Post-Western World and the Rise of a Parallel Order

In the coming weeks, observers from Moscow to Bras?lia will look towards the United States, where voters face a stark choice between two radically different presidential candidates.

Power-Sharing in Europe: Models for the Ukraine?

Some form of power-sharing arrangement could pave the way to reconciling the conflict in the Ukraine and in relations between the EU and Russia is a valid one.

Labour Migration from Central Asia to Russia in the Context of the Economic Crisis

The migration corridor that has formed between the countries of Central Asia and Russia is one of the largest and most stable in Eurasia and the world.

Russia “Understanders” in Europe: Discourses, Communication, Consequenc

The Ukraine conflict reinforced the desire of Kremlin policymakers to establish connections with a range of anti-status-quo groups in Europe.

The “Return of Stalin”: Understanding the Surge of Historical Politics in Russia

Two principal and emotional points of history have again been placed on the national stage: the Great Patriotic War (a unifying memory) and the era of Joseph Stalin (a point of contention).