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Anatoly Vishnevsky

Anatoly Vishnevsky is Director of the Institute of Demography of the State University- Higher School of Economics. He holds a Doctorate in Economics.

  • 30 june 2013

    Myths and Realities

    Rejection of anti-migrant mythology should not lead to an underestimation of the risks associated with migration, but help develop a sober constructive policy that would minimize migration risks and maximize its benefits.

  • 2 march 2008

    Multipolarity and Demography

    An excessive rapprochement with growing China, which lacks resources of its own, may impose “allied obligations” on Russia, which can ultimately result in the limitation of its rights to its own resources and to territories where they are located. Moscow will be able to successfully defend its interests only by relying on the solidarity of countries of the North, which are in the same demographic boat with it.

  • 8 may 2006

    Modernization and Counter-Modernization in Russia

    The Soviet political shell has been crushed, but Russia is still wandering around amidst the scattered fragments of that shell, which remain hopeful that they will be put together again some day. They are hoping for a counter-modernization union, albeit with a non-Communist configuration.

  • 18 may 2005

    The Specter of Immigration

    (1)

    In spite of all of its risks and challenges, immigration offers Russia a chance to survive and to carry out a kind of peaceful expansion. A strategy of diehard anti-immigration isolationism, on the other hand, will lead it nowhere.

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  • 16 september 2003

    The Depopulated Superpower

    The dramatic demographic changes in the world are creating an unprecedented challenge for all states, yet the problems confronting Russia, a country with a low birth rate and a very high death rate, are particularly acute.
    Their solution will require a revision of many traditional views; however, neither the nation nor its leaders are prepared for that.

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Publisher's column

Russia’s Victory, new Concert of Nations

Russia was resolved and would win, which it actually did by the beginning of 2016. Threats to tear its economy to tatters and organize regime change either through asphyxiating sanctions, organizing “a conspiracy of oligarchs” or popular discontent have been forgotten.

Editor's column

Here’s Why U.S.-Russia Military Conflict Over Syria Is Looking More And More Likely

To repair his abysmal approval rating, Trump is likely to further intervene in Syria, prompting a dangerous Russian response.


Should Moscow put a brake on rapprochement with Washington?

Three areas of cooperation with Russia outlined in a leaked U.S. State Department document might suffice initially for an amelioration of the currently dismal bilateral relationship. Yet, doubts persist that the Trump administration has enough dry powder to get a modest “reset” kick-started.

On the “Special” Nature of the Russia–Cyprus Relationship

Most Greek Cypriots bestow gratitude on Moscow, for its prolonged, consistent, and multi-layered protection of their Republic, through diplomatic, political, economic and “psychological” support.

Russia’s Allies and the Geopolitical Frontier in Eurasia

The risk of Russia’s involvement in low-intensity military conflicts has been growing since the early 2000s. Instability along many stretches of the border has forced Moscow to increase its military presence in the neighboring areas.

Defense Through Leadership: Turkey on the Eve of Its Constitutional Referendum

The April 16 referendum will focus on power distribution rather than institution building. In other words, the organizers saw it as an opportunity to expand the President’s powers and allow him to rule longer. In their turn, Turks perceived it as an institutional choice to contribute to the development of the state.

Turkey and Russia, Erdogan and Putin

By the summer of 2016, it had become relatively commonplace in Western policy circles to wonder if Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan was following in the footsteps of Russian President Vladimir Putin, and, if so, how far down that path he would take Turkey.

The Need to Massage Egos: Status Politics as a Crucial Element of US-Russia Relations

Despite multiple official declarations of non-adversarial intentions issued by the United States and Russia over the past quarter-century, both sides have been unable to avoid repeated bouts of conflict escalation.