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Anatoly Vishnevsky

Anatoly Vishnevsky is Director of the Institute of Demography of the State University- Higher School of Economics. He holds a Doctorate in Economics.

  • 30 june 2013

    Myths and Realities

    Rejection of anti-migrant mythology should not lead to an underestimation of the risks associated with migration, but help develop a sober constructive policy that would minimize migration risks and maximize its benefits.

  • 2 march 2008

    Multipolarity and Demography

    An excessive rapprochement with growing China, which lacks resources of its own, may impose “allied obligations” on Russia, which can ultimately result in the limitation of its rights to its own resources and to territories where they are located. Moscow will be able to successfully defend its interests only by relying on the solidarity of countries of the North, which are in the same demographic boat with it.

  • 8 may 2006

    Modernization and Counter-Modernization in Russia

    The Soviet political shell has been crushed, but Russia is still wandering around amidst the scattered fragments of that shell, which remain hopeful that they will be put together again some day. They are hoping for a counter-modernization union, albeit with a non-Communist configuration.

  • 18 may 2005

    The Specter of Immigration

    (1)

    In spite of all of its risks and challenges, immigration offers Russia a chance to survive and to carry out a kind of peaceful expansion. A strategy of diehard anti-immigration isolationism, on the other hand, will lead it nowhere.

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  • 16 september 2003

    The Depopulated Superpower

    The dramatic demographic changes in the world are creating an unprecedented challenge for all states, yet the problems confronting Russia, a country with a low birth rate and a very high death rate, are particularly acute.
    Their solution will require a revision of many traditional views; however, neither the nation nor its leaders are prepared for that.

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Russia-Japan -- peace can wait

Putin has snubbed Abe as he boosts links with China amid growing US hostility to Beijing and Moscow.


Living in a Crumbling World. Valdai Club Annual Report

In each of its annual reports since 2014, the Valdai Discussion Club has consistently spoken of the need to restore global governance – meaning the resolution of emerging and growing problems through institutions-based cooperation between states holding particular political and economic importance to world affairs.

Russia and Turkey: Approaches to Regional Security in the Middle East

Transformational processes in the Arab world in the beginning of the 2010s led Russia and Turkey to an understanding of the need to form new foreign policy approaches towards the Middle East. This article seeks to identify the impact of the approaches Russia and Turkey have taken on this issue on relations between Moscow and Ankara.

The Great Delusion: Liberal Dreams and International Realities

This is an excerpt from the new book The Great Delusion : Liberal Dreams and International Realities by John Mearsheimer.

Islam and Global Commons: The Gap between Principles and Practices

It is estimated that there are approximately 1.6 billion Muslims in the world today, who represent over 20% of the world’s population. No one is exempt from the vagaries of climate change, and Muslims have to accept their share of the responsibility.

The Summit in Singapore and the Failure of Donald Trump’s Diplomacy

It seemed before the Singapore summit, - the meeting of the leaders of the US and North Korea, which was drawing attention of the whole international community while being prepared, that Donald Trump’s “blackmail diplomacy” proved its effectiveness. However, is it possible to consider his policy towards Pyongyang and his administration’s foreign policy a success?