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Richard Lachmann

Richard Lachmann is Professor of Sociology at the University at Albany, State University of New York.

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Publisher's column

Russia’s Victory, new Concert of Nations

Russia was resolved and would win, which it actually did by the beginning of 2016. Threats to tear its economy to tatters and organize regime change either through asphyxiating sanctions, organizing “a conspiracy of oligarchs” or popular discontent have been forgotten.

Editor's column

Here’s Why U.S.-Russia Military Conflict Over Syria Is Looking More And More Likely

To repair his abysmal approval rating, Trump is likely to further intervene in Syria, prompting a dangerous Russian response.


Iran voted Rouhani again – now what? The $350-billion question for Trump

For a country labelled a theocracy, Iran certainly knows how to throw a presidential election. One more cynical than I may even go so far as to posit that Iran has mastered the art of democracy, right down to the posters and caps.

Presidential Elections in Iran Will Not Affect Relations with Russia

If the current President of Iran, Hassan Rouhani is defeated, we should expect significant changes in the country's domestic and foreign policies, but this will not affect relations with Russia.

Russia’s Allies and the Geopolitical Frontier in Eurasia

The risk of Russia’s involvement in low-intensity military conflicts has been growing since the early 2000s. Instability along many stretches of the border has forced Moscow to increase its military presence in the neighboring areas.

Defense Through Leadership: Turkey on the Eve of Its Constitutional Referendum

The April 16 referendum will focus on power distribution rather than institution building. In other words, the organizers saw it as an opportunity to expand the President’s powers and allow him to rule longer. In their turn, Turks perceived it as an institutional choice to contribute to the development of the state.

Russia’s Strategic Calculus: Threat Perceptions and Military Doctrine

Russian foreign policy is driven by the political elites’ search for a new basis for national self-esteem after the collapse of the Soviet Union disrupted old Soviet identities.

It’s Not All Negative: Russian Media’s Flexible Coverage of Protest as a Regime Survival Strategy

Pundits continue to debate whether economic shocks, public discontent at home, and isolation abroad will shake President Vladimir Putin’s regime.