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Kadri Liik

Kadri Liik is a senior policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations.

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Publisher's column

Russia’s Victory, new Concert of Nations

Russia was resolved and would win, which it actually did by the beginning of 2016. Threats to tear its economy to tatters and organize regime change either through asphyxiating sanctions, organizing “a conspiracy of oligarchs” or popular discontent have been forgotten.

Editor's column

Atlantic Drift: Russia and the U.S.-Europe Divide

Relations between Russia, Europe, and the United States are in flux as none is able or wants to maintain what it once had. An attempt to revive the Cold War paradigm has failed, and a new framework of relations has not formed. This state of uncertainty will most likely endure until each player achieves a measure of domestic stability.


Jumpstarting the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

A series of diplomatic talks, which took place on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly, touched on Middle Eastern affairs and specifically on the revival of the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process. This had seemed to have been high on President Trump’s agenda, when he met Prime Minister Netanyahu, President of the Palestinian Authority Abbas and the Egyptian President el-Sisi.

What Awaits Syria?

Syria has suffered great damage after the years-long conflict. Regional and global actors’ joint efforts are required to root out terrorism, rebuild the economy and resolve a humanitarian crisis in the country.

Great Power Interventions and the Future of Responsibility to Protect

It may often seem that a whole epoch has passed since the Kosovo Commission’s oft-cited conclusion that the NATO intervention into Yugoslavia in 1999 was “illegal, but legitimate”.

Russia–US Relations and the Future of Syria

The greatest analytical challenge in trying to understand the Syrian civil wars overcoming the propensity to see the world as it was and not as it is. It is tempting to look at Syria on a map and imagine that one day soon it could be put back together – if only a resolution could be found during diplomatic meetings in Astana or Istanbul.

Turkey and Russia, Erdogan and Putin

By the summer of 2016, it had become relatively commonplace in Western policy circles to wonder if Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan was following in the footsteps of Russian President Vladimir Putin, and, if so, how far down that path he would take Turkey.

The Need to Massage Egos: Status Politics as a Crucial Element of US-Russia Relations

Despite multiple official declarations of non-adversarial intentions issued by the United States and Russia over the past quarter-century, both sides have been unable to avoid repeated bouts of conflict escalation.