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Pavel Zolotarev

Pavel Zolotarev is Deputy Director of the Institute for U.S. and Canadian Studies at the Russian Academy of Sciences; Major General (retired).

  • 22 september 2015

    The Missed History Classes

    Generally speaking, there are no grounds in Russian-U.S. relations for reviving the Cold War and going to the brink of mutual assured destruction. In the presence of common threats, geopolitical interests can adversely impact bilateral relations only to a certain extent. But the current tendencies do not give hope for their speedy improvement.

  • 30 june 2013

    Between Guns, Bread and Common Sense

    The current trend is such that military force is gradually turning from a foreign policy tool into a military power potential. The purpose is to solve political tasks without using military force but relying entirely on the superiority in military potential.

  • 9 august 2008

    Missile Defense Challenges

    Russia and the U.S. have become hostages of Cold War weapons, above all ground-based intercontinental ballistic missiles which cannot be placed in a reduced launch readiness status without violating the normal mode of operation. Therefore, the system of “mutual assured destruction” must be maintained.

  • 13 may 2007

    Russian and U.S. Defense Policies in the Era of Globalization

    The West does not want to see Russia strong; it fears it. However, it seems that it is not the West but Russia itself that is driving the country onto a self-destructive path. The executive power has become hostage to forces whose well-being depends on defense orders. Moreover, under the influence of these forces a new defense policy of Russia has begun to take shape.

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Publisher's column

Russia’s Victory, new Concert of Nations

Russia was resolved and would win, which it actually did by the beginning of 2016. Threats to tear its economy to tatters and organize regime change either through asphyxiating sanctions, organizing “a conspiracy of oligarchs” or popular discontent have been forgotten.

Editor's column

Here’s Why U.S.-Russia Military Conflict Over Syria Is Looking More And More Likely

To repair his abysmal approval rating, Trump is likely to further intervene in Syria, prompting a dangerous Russian response.


Should Moscow put a brake on rapprochement with Washington?

Three areas of cooperation with Russia outlined in a leaked U.S. State Department document might suffice initially for an amelioration of the currently dismal bilateral relationship. Yet, doubts persist that the Trump administration has enough dry powder to get a modest “reset” kick-started.

On the “Special” Nature of the Russia–Cyprus Relationship

Most Greek Cypriots bestow gratitude on Moscow, for its prolonged, consistent, and multi-layered protection of their Republic, through diplomatic, political, economic and “psychological” support.

Russia’s Allies and the Geopolitical Frontier in Eurasia

The risk of Russia’s involvement in low-intensity military conflicts has been growing since the early 2000s. Instability along many stretches of the border has forced Moscow to increase its military presence in the neighboring areas.

Defense Through Leadership: Turkey on the Eve of Its Constitutional Referendum

The April 16 referendum will focus on power distribution rather than institution building. In other words, the organizers saw it as an opportunity to expand the President’s powers and allow him to rule longer. In their turn, Turks perceived it as an institutional choice to contribute to the development of the state.

Turkey and Russia, Erdogan and Putin

By the summer of 2016, it had become relatively commonplace in Western policy circles to wonder if Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan was following in the footsteps of Russian President Vladimir Putin, and, if so, how far down that path he would take Turkey.

The Need to Massage Egos: Status Politics as a Crucial Element of US-Russia Relations

Despite multiple official declarations of non-adversarial intentions issued by the United States and Russia over the past quarter-century, both sides have been unable to avoid repeated bouts of conflict escalation.