Agenda
  • 13 february 2019

    Heartland Reunion: Geopolitical Chimera or Historical Chance?

    Anyone who has at least some idea about the theory of international relations should remember the oft-quoted formula put forward by the father of British geopolitics, Halford Mackinder: “Who rules the Heartland commands the World-Island; who rules the World-Island commands the world.”

  • 7 february 2019

    Why Is It So Difficult for Russia and Japan to Come to Agreement?

    Experts had many expectations ahead of the Russian-Japanese summit held in Moscow in late January. Many believed that the meeting between the two leaders would lead to a breakthrough expressed in the signing of a peace treaty and introduction of full clarity in the matter of the Japanese claims to four Kuril islands.

  • 5 february 2019

    The Domino Effect: America’s Withdrawal from the INF Treaty and Its Ramifications

    The United States has launched the procedure of withdrawal from the Treaty on the Elimination of the Intermediate-Range and Shorter-Range Missiles (INF Treaty). Russia, in turn, also suspended its participation in the INF.

  • 4 february 2019

    Russia in Global Affairs journal is accepted by Scopus

    The editorial board of Russia in Global Affairs are happy to announce that by the decision of the Content Selection & Advisory Board as of January 27, 2019, the English-language version of the journal was included in the Scopus bibliographic and reference database.

  • 4 february 2019

    How the United States Got Russia Wrong

    The West today is paying for its collusion with Russia in the 1990s.

  • 30 january 2019

    An Unforeseeable Europe

    2016 was perhaps the most difficult year for Europe since the turn of the century. Under the inept leadership of David Cameron’s cabinet, the United Kingdom voted in favour of leaving the European Union. The United States elected Donald Trump, an outspoken critic of the European project, as its president. The European continent continued to fight the unprecedented influx of refugees and migrants...

  • 28 january 2019

    The Kuril Social Contract

    The Kremlin needs to understand clearly that it is up against not just Japan but also the Russian public—and based on public opinion surveys, two-thirds of Russians do not want to hand over the Kuril Islands. The Kremlin will not be able to coerce the people into accepting its point of view.

  • 23 january 2019

    The World After the INF Treaty: How to Get Out of the Dead Zone

    It looks as if there is no salvation for the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF Treaty). One could shout oneself hoarse arguing whether the treaty had a chance of survival, but this will be the task of future historians. At this point in time, it is much more important to think about a world without the INF Treaty and whether we can resume control of weapons in some other form.

  • 15 january 2019

    The World Needs Europe

    Having emerged from centuries of bloodshed to become the poster child for integration and collaboration, Europe has a distinct service to offer the rest of the world. With the international order coming apart and populist nationalism on the rise, now is the time for the European Union to show leadership, both at home and abroad.

  • 11 january 2019

    Political Multipolarity vs. Economic Unipolarity: 2018 Results and 2019 Intrigues

    Summing up the results of 2018, one is tempted to lay emphasis on a number of major events and trends. However, that carries the risk of neglecting systemic issues that generate the diversity of individual phenomena. The understanding of these issues provides us with an analytical ability that helps us attribute numerous events to a more or less understandable model.

  • 24 december 2018

    Entering 2019: Challenges and Opportunities

    We should fully reject the concept of Western, or liberal, universalism in favor of developmental pluralism.

  • 24 december 2018

    The Brexit Intrigue and Theresa May’s Future

    The decision to postpone until late January the December 11 vote in the House of Commons on the Withdrawal Agreement stipulating the terms of Britain’s exit from the European Union, agreement approved by the EU on November 25, created real chaos in the Brexit issue, this time at the government policy level.

  • 19 december 2018

    Russia's view and interests changes in Northeast Asia

    South Korean President Moon Jae-in's efforts to stimulate inter-Korean detente and the ongoing denuclearization talks between North Korea and the U.S. are both welcome by Moscow and essential for achieving Russia's policy priorities with regards to Northeast Asia and Asia in general.

  • 18 december 2018

    As International Order Crumbles, Dialogue Is Crucial for Restoring Trust

    In an interview with valdaiclub.com on the sidelines of the 18th Doha Forum, where the Valdai Club held a special session, Wolfgang Ischinger, Chairman of the Munich Security Conference, discussed the risks to international order and the ways to avoid unintended escalation between the key players.

  • 11 december 2018

    Political Crisis in France: Locked by Elites

    We entered a political crisis. The incidents of Saturday, November 1, the evolution of claims and slogans of the Yellow Vests prove it.

  • 11 december 2018

    Crimea and Punishment

    On 25 November, Russia seized 24 Ukrainian sailors in the Kerch Strait, which connects the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. It is the first open clash between the two countries since 2014.

  • 7 december 2018

    Scaling Down Ambitions? G20 Agenda Evolves from Global Governance to Bilateral Consultations

    The fate of the G20 is an example of how difficult it is in the modern world to establish any formalized forms of international or global governance. Despite the fact that problems are increasingly truly global in nature, their solution is becoming increasingly national. States do their due for their own citizens and, as a rule, do not take into account the interests of mankind as a whole.

  • 4 december 2018

    Scaling Down Ambitions? G20 Agenda Evolves from Global Governance to Bilateral Consultations

    The fate of the G20 is an example of how difficult it is in the modern world to establish any formalized forms of international or global governance. Despite the fact that problems are increasingly truly global in nature, their solution is becoming increasingly national. States do their due for their own citizens and, as a rule, do not take into account the interests of mankind as a whole.

  • 3 december 2018

    Sanctions for the Violation of Sanctions: Businesses on US Treasury Radar

    Many evaluations of the US sanctions policy focus on major political steps – the adoption of new laws, the US President’s executive orders, the drafting of new bills, etc. At the same time, the practice of US regulators punishing specific companies for violating sanctions is of great interest. Such practices say a lot about the specifics of the sanctions policy and their effectiveness.

  • 29 november 2018

    Sanctions for the Violation of Sanctions: Businesses on US Treasury Radar

    Many evaluations of the US sanctions policy focus on major political steps – the adoption of new laws, the US President’s executive orders, the drafting of new bills, etc. At the same time, the practice of US regulators punishing specific companies for violating sanctions is of great interest. Such practices say a lot about the specifics of the sanctions policy and their effectiveness.

  • 28 november 2018

    Russia and Ukraine: Four Scenarios for the Future

    Nearly five years have passed since the start of the dramatic events of the Maidan in Kiev that engendered a profound crisis in Russia’s relations with both Ukraine and the West.

  • 23 november 2018

    Russia: the Power Broker in the Middle East?

    Historically, the Middle East has never been a Russia’s strategic priority comparable to Europe, the North-East Pacific or even the Central Asia. Unlike many other major European powers, Russia had no colonial ambitions in the region...

  • 23 november 2018

    Angela Merkel’s New Momentum

    Since German Chancellor Angela Merkel announced that she will not seek another term and will step down as her party's leader at the end of this year, political obituaries have been rolling in. But far from bowing out quietly, Merkel will use her remaining time in office to cement her legacy as a defender of the European project.

  • 19 november 2018

    The United States, Russia, and Europe in 2018

    CSIS and RIAC Meeting Report

  • 19 november 2018

    The War That Determined Russian History for the Next 100 Years

    If we count the Napoleonic Wars, then the First World War was actually the Second. For a century after Napoleon, it was assumed that war is always limited and fighting is followed by negotiations. War was not an existential threat for the states.

  • 14 november 2018

    On Russia’s Power: is Winter Coming?

    On November 11–12, 2018, Abu Dhabi hosted the fifth annual expert meeting within the strategic dialog organized by Emirates Policy Center with the support of the UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  • 8 november 2018

    Mapping Global Strategic Stability in the Twenty-First Century

    The U.S.-Russia strategic relationship—the only one to have featured strategic arms control—is no longer central to global strategic stability.

  • 8 november 2018

    Anti-Russia Sanctions: A Fall Lull?

    After the high-profile events of August, an unusual lull befell the battlefields of the sanctions war. The sanctions have ceased for the time being to be a direct cause of volatility in the stock market and foreign exchange markets.

  • 2 november 2018

    How Russia's Greater Eurasia Plan May Spell the End of EU-Centric Model

    After a 500 year-long struggle for recognition of its status as a European power, Russia has positioned itself as a pivot to the East to develop Greater Eurasia, Glenn Diesen, a professor at the Higher School of Economics, told Sputnik, adding that this may spell the end of the Western-centric geo-economic infrastructure.

  • 2 november 2018

    What of a Future Canada-Russia Relationship?

    How Canada, in occasional partnership with Russia, could begin to drive higher-order issues on a global basis.

Archives
Choose year
Choose issue
Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Will US pullout from Syria increase risk of conflict with Russia?

The announcement of the US pullout from Syria was received with caution in Moscow. Besides the security and political challenges it may bring about, the Trump decision could mean the end of a practical, relatively constructive US-Russian approach to conflict at flashpoints.


Trump’s Trade Wars, Asia, and Russia

The key question with regard to US-China relations overall is whether the US business community, which has been until recently the foundation of US domestic support for the China relations, feels more able to do business.

Communication Lines in Diplomacy: Expanding the Possibility Set

The problem with communication in today’s world may be the illusion that real communication is taking place and no additional lines of communication are necessary. The truth of the matter is that there is still sizeable potential to raise the “technological capacity” in international diplomatic communication to a higher level via allocating the “frequency bandwidth” to regional blocks and other stakeholders.

The comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty: Another victim of US nuclear policy?

Amid a number of nuclear nonproliferation and arms control crises, the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty was well down the list of pressing nuclear issues – until now.

Common Dreams or Vulgar Delusions? Elite Preoccupations in Discourses about the ‘Commons’

Our age is witness to a proliferation of discourses about the ‘commons’. They are emerging from more and more quarters, and the word is being applied to more things than ever before. One important strand of discourse, claiming to be communist, seeks to apply it to all kinds of spheres, from the earth and its natural bounty to culture, and to all sorts of resources, from the most immaterial, such as common knowledge, to the most material, such as the use of the earth’s finite natural resources. Internet activists refer to information and knowledge that exits on the web as the ‘digital commons’.

Globalization: New Pathways Along the South–South Axis

The year 2018 was marked by escalation in trade tensions among the world’s largest economies, mostly via bilateral trade restrictions.