Agenda
  • 4 february 2019

    How the United States Got Russia Wrong

    The West today is paying for its collusion with Russia in the 1990s.

  • 30 january 2019

    An Unforeseeable Europe

    2016 was perhaps the most difficult year for Europe since the turn of the century. Under the inept leadership of David Cameron’s cabinet, the United Kingdom voted in favour of leaving the European Union. The United States elected Donald Trump, an outspoken critic of the European project, as its president. The European continent continued to fight the unprecedented influx of refugees and migrants...

  • 28 january 2019

    The Kuril Social Contract

    The Kremlin needs to understand clearly that it is up against not just Japan but also the Russian public—and based on public opinion surveys, two-thirds of Russians do not want to hand over the Kuril Islands. The Kremlin will not be able to coerce the people into accepting its point of view.

  • 23 january 2019

    The World After the INF Treaty: How to Get Out of the Dead Zone

    It looks as if there is no salvation for the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF Treaty). One could shout oneself hoarse arguing whether the treaty had a chance of survival, but this will be the task of future historians. At this point in time, it is much more important to think about a world without the INF Treaty and whether we can resume control of weapons in some other form.

  • 15 january 2019

    The World Needs Europe

    Having emerged from centuries of bloodshed to become the poster child for integration and collaboration, Europe has a distinct service to offer the rest of the world. With the international order coming apart and populist nationalism on the rise, now is the time for the European Union to show leadership, both at home and abroad.

  • 11 january 2019

    Political Multipolarity vs. Economic Unipolarity: 2018 Results and 2019 Intrigues

    Summing up the results of 2018, one is tempted to lay emphasis on a number of major events and trends. However, that carries the risk of neglecting systemic issues that generate the diversity of individual phenomena. The understanding of these issues provides us with an analytical ability that helps us attribute numerous events to a more or less understandable model.

  • 24 december 2018

    Entering 2019: Challenges and Opportunities

    We should fully reject the concept of Western, or liberal, universalism in favor of developmental pluralism.

  • 24 december 2018

    The Brexit Intrigue and Theresa May’s Future

    The decision to postpone until late January the December 11 vote in the House of Commons on the Withdrawal Agreement stipulating the terms of Britain’s exit from the European Union, agreement approved by the EU on November 25, created real chaos in the Brexit issue, this time at the government policy level.

  • 19 december 2018

    Russia's view and interests changes in Northeast Asia

    South Korean President Moon Jae-in's efforts to stimulate inter-Korean detente and the ongoing denuclearization talks between North Korea and the U.S. are both welcome by Moscow and essential for achieving Russia's policy priorities with regards to Northeast Asia and Asia in general.

  • 18 december 2018

    As International Order Crumbles, Dialogue Is Crucial for Restoring Trust

    In an interview with valdaiclub.com on the sidelines of the 18th Doha Forum, where the Valdai Club held a special session, Wolfgang Ischinger, Chairman of the Munich Security Conference, discussed the risks to international order and the ways to avoid unintended escalation between the key players.

  • 11 december 2018

    Political Crisis in France: Locked by Elites

    We entered a political crisis. The incidents of Saturday, November 1, the evolution of claims and slogans of the Yellow Vests prove it.

  • 11 december 2018

    Crimea and Punishment

    On 25 November, Russia seized 24 Ukrainian sailors in the Kerch Strait, which connects the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. It is the first open clash between the two countries since 2014.

  • 7 december 2018

    Scaling Down Ambitions? G20 Agenda Evolves from Global Governance to Bilateral Consultations

    The fate of the G20 is an example of how difficult it is in the modern world to establish any formalized forms of international or global governance. Despite the fact that problems are increasingly truly global in nature, their solution is becoming increasingly national. States do their due for their own citizens and, as a rule, do not take into account the interests of mankind as a whole.

  • 4 december 2018

    Scaling Down Ambitions? G20 Agenda Evolves from Global Governance to Bilateral Consultations

    The fate of the G20 is an example of how difficult it is in the modern world to establish any formalized forms of international or global governance. Despite the fact that problems are increasingly truly global in nature, their solution is becoming increasingly national. States do their due for their own citizens and, as a rule, do not take into account the interests of mankind as a whole.

  • 3 december 2018

    Sanctions for the Violation of Sanctions: Businesses on US Treasury Radar

    Many evaluations of the US sanctions policy focus on major political steps – the adoption of new laws, the US President’s executive orders, the drafting of new bills, etc. At the same time, the practice of US regulators punishing specific companies for violating sanctions is of great interest. Such practices say a lot about the specifics of the sanctions policy and their effectiveness.

  • 29 november 2018

    Sanctions for the Violation of Sanctions: Businesses on US Treasury Radar

    Many evaluations of the US sanctions policy focus on major political steps – the adoption of new laws, the US President’s executive orders, the drafting of new bills, etc. At the same time, the practice of US regulators punishing specific companies for violating sanctions is of great interest. Such practices say a lot about the specifics of the sanctions policy and their effectiveness.

  • 28 november 2018

    Russia and Ukraine: Four Scenarios for the Future

    Nearly five years have passed since the start of the dramatic events of the Maidan in Kiev that engendered a profound crisis in Russia’s relations with both Ukraine and the West.

  • 23 november 2018

    Russia: the Power Broker in the Middle East?

    Historically, the Middle East has never been a Russia’s strategic priority comparable to Europe, the North-East Pacific or even the Central Asia. Unlike many other major European powers, Russia had no colonial ambitions in the region...

  • 23 november 2018

    Angela Merkel’s New Momentum

    Since German Chancellor Angela Merkel announced that she will not seek another term and will step down as her party's leader at the end of this year, political obituaries have been rolling in. But far from bowing out quietly, Merkel will use her remaining time in office to cement her legacy as a defender of the European project.

  • 19 november 2018

    The United States, Russia, and Europe in 2018

    CSIS and RIAC Meeting Report

  • 19 november 2018

    The War That Determined Russian History for the Next 100 Years

    If we count the Napoleonic Wars, then the First World War was actually the Second. For a century after Napoleon, it was assumed that war is always limited and fighting is followed by negotiations. War was not an existential threat for the states.

  • 14 november 2018

    On Russia’s Power: is Winter Coming?

    On November 11–12, 2018, Abu Dhabi hosted the fifth annual expert meeting within the strategic dialog organized by Emirates Policy Center with the support of the UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  • 8 november 2018

    Mapping Global Strategic Stability in the Twenty-First Century

    The U.S.-Russia strategic relationship—the only one to have featured strategic arms control—is no longer central to global strategic stability.

  • 8 november 2018

    Anti-Russia Sanctions: A Fall Lull?

    After the high-profile events of August, an unusual lull befell the battlefields of the sanctions war. The sanctions have ceased for the time being to be a direct cause of volatility in the stock market and foreign exchange markets.

  • 2 november 2018

    How Russia's Greater Eurasia Plan May Spell the End of EU-Centric Model

    After a 500 year-long struggle for recognition of its status as a European power, Russia has positioned itself as a pivot to the East to develop Greater Eurasia, Glenn Diesen, a professor at the Higher School of Economics, told Sputnik, adding that this may spell the end of the Western-centric geo-economic infrastructure.

  • 2 november 2018

    What of a Future Canada-Russia Relationship?

    How Canada, in occasional partnership with Russia, could begin to drive higher-order issues on a global basis.

  • 31 october 2018

    The Danger of Withdrawing From the INF Treaty

    Breaking arms control agreements is much easier than concluding them, but history shows that rejecting arms control agreements never improves one’s security and always damages it, a lesson that Moscow and Washington should heed.

  • 30 october 2018

    EAEU: Integration Junction

    The fact that, in the 20th century, states have learned to take into consideration cooperation matters when identifying the main goals and objectives of their foreign policy,is a vastly positive development. That is not enough, though.

  • 29 october 2018

    Marginalization in Globalization

    Even the most controversial Chinese assessments concerning Russian diplomacy are of interest as they are formulated not from the Western point of view but from the position of China as a new rising power seeking to create its own specific national style in diplomacy.

  • 26 october 2018

    U.S. Withdrawal From the INF Treaty and the End of the Bilateral Era

    Strategic arms control has long been a foundation of U.S.-Russia relations, and removing this pillar will have profound consequences for the bilateral relationship. Neither Moscow nor Washington has displayed much political will or persistence to rescue the INF Treaty. Strategic arms control as it has been known for almost half a century is coming to its logical end.

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Will US pullout from Syria increase risk of conflict with Russia?

The announcement of the US pullout from Syria was received with caution in Moscow. Besides the security and political challenges it may bring about, the Trump decision could mean the end of a practical, relatively constructive US-Russian approach to conflict at flashpoints.


Keynes Goes Global: Anticipating the Global Slowdown

As the world economy shows mounting signs of deceleration and recessionary fears intensify across global markets, the world community is likely to focus increasingly on how to undertake an effective anti-crisis response.

A Kingdom divided against himself. Special edition

This is a special issue of Russia in Global Affairs, dedicated to this big topic. Thirty years after the end of the Cold War, euphoria over the triumph of liberal ideology, which is “omnipotent because it is true,” has given way to dark pessimism about the future and led to the loss of ideational and moral guidelines.

China: How Fragile Is the Giant?

China is Russia's most important and responsible partner in the international arena. The five years that have passed since the beginning of the fundamental complication of relations between Russia and the West have shown that despite prejudices and lack of trust at the grassroots level, relations between the two countries remain friendly.

Crisis in 21st Century Political Warfare

In order to gain a freer hand in exercising foreign policy and pursuing those objectives, which include practices such as regime change, the US and its allies needed to change the manner in which the rules and boundaries of international relations were conceived and applied.

The Syrian Crisis: A Thorny Path from War to Peace

The second decade of the 21st century began with a string of explosive protests in the Middle East and North Africa, which have destabilized not only the countries that saw violent regime change but the entire region. A way out of the profound systemic crisis is yet to be found.