№ 3 July/September 2004
  • Gone with the Wind of Change

    Fifteen years ago, in the early summer of 1989, the entire Soviet nation was glued to the television, not believing its eyes. At that time, the country held its first Congress of People’s Deputies of the Soviet Union, and it was then that public politics first arose in Russia.

  • The Times of Mars

    U.S. President George W. Bush is planning to return the Americans to the Moon, and then on to Mars. But alas, the grandiose plans are less a daring desire to explore the universe than a cunning political reckoning and pre-election move.

  • The United Nations in the 21st Century

    The international community is facing new forms of danger that will demand new forms of action. For the United Nations, the world's primary agency for peace and security and its center for harmonizing the policies of nations on important matters, this is an especial challenge. Only an evident willingness to adapt and to renew its sense of mission will inspire, in the governments and peoples of the world, the confidence and support.

  • An Apologia of the Westphalian System

    The Westphalian system has long been the target of numerous attacks, but the most serious threat to its existence – and thus to the foundations of the constitutional systems of sovereign states – has emerged at the beginning of the 21st century, especially after September 11, 2001.

  • Russian Foreign Policy Vertical

    Today Russia possesses unique opportunities for switching from a policy of response to to a policy of initiation when considering international events. But to take avail of these opportunities, Russia must adjust its foreign policy mechanism.

  • The Logic of Russian Transition

    It could be persuasively argued that the goals of the post-Communist transformation have been successfully accomplished. The dominant socio-economic problems confronting Russia today are the crisis of the industrial system and the establishment of the socio-economic foundation of a post-industrial society.

  • Leave and Make Room

    The presidential regime in Russia has put an end to opposition parties, both on the left and on the right. There is no room for them in the new system of non-alternative power. It goes without saying that the president and his minions do not need them. Moreover, the electorate does not need these parties, either.

  • The Chechen Path to Russian Statehood

    In Chechnya we are witnessing a rather painful failure of the strategy of substituting effectual technologies and PR simulations for a real meaningful policy – something that has become a trademark of part of the President’s team. But real stability is different from its virtual representation.

  • The Unbearable Lightness of Petrodollars

    High oil prices on the world market give the oil-exporting countries an opportunity to implement reforms, but their governments tend to miss this chance since the favorable situation on the market paralyzes their will to do so.

  • The West’s Energy Security and the Role of Russia

    In the next few decades, Russia’s role as the world’s major fuel source will continue to grow. Considering its indisputable leadership in energy resources and, potentially, in export permits Moscow to demand an equitable and respectful relationship with its partners.

  • The World After Oil

    There are no profound grounds for the statement that global oil prices will remain high for an indefinitely long time. Moreover, it looks like the days (or rather years) of oil as a leader among global energy sources are numbered.

    Tags
  • A Broad View of the "Broader Middle East"

    The situation in the Middle East is proving to be a waste of valuable human and material resources that are necessary for the development of the region. The peoples and governments of the region recognize the need for reform, which will be assisted by the declared willingness of the international community.

  • Forced Democracy and the Repercussions

    A simplified approach to the Middle East problems does not conform to local realities. It would be more fruitful to follow the ‘do-no-harm’ principle, separating what must be reformed from traditional elements of life that do not impede the modernization processes.

  • Prospects for the Iraqi Settlement

    Washington is unlikely to fully replace the occupation troops in Iraq with a UN peacekeeping force. But cooperation with the UN would broaden the Bush administration’s room for maneuver. Such was the conclusion of a situation analysis headed by Academician Yevgeny Primakov.

  • Afghanistan Under Lease

    The Americans had no illusions about the Afghan mojaheds from the very start, and extremely simplistic people only could hope in earnest that they could become the heralds of Afghan democracy. As an Afghan once formulated: "One cannot buy us out, one can only lease us for a while".

  • Rethinking Russia-EU Relations

    Over the last ten years, since Russia and the European Union signed the Partnership and Cooperation Agreement, the entire world has seen so many dramatic changes that the PCA has ceased to be an adequate political and legal foundation for Russia-EU relations. The legal basis for these relations must be completely renewed.

  • Why Invent a New Model? - Review of the discussion at the Russian Economic Forum

    It is difficult to forecast a formula for future Russia-EU relations – they simply run against too many unknown factors. We don’t know what the European Union will be in seven to ten years. Russia is undergoing serious changes, as well, and it is also unclear what their outcome will be.

  • Baltic "Laboratory" for the Wider Europe

    Progress in Russia-EU relations gives the participants an opportunity to look at the Baltic region’s prospects from a new perspective. This part of the Old World can become a real proving ground for testing models of effective cooperation.

  • It Is Too Early to Relax, Russia

    There is a general consensus that it is time for Russia to make a breakthrough into the future. It is almost perfectly clear today what needs to be done, and equally clear how it should be achieved. The greatest paradox, however, is that after fifteen years of post-totalitarian development, a question is looming large: who should Russia make the breakthrough with?

  • A Battle Between Business and Bureaucracy

    The current situation in Russia seems to be a bit of a paradox – the economy is developing at record-breaking rates, while a serious conflict is flaring between the government and the business community. A victory by either side in the war between business and bureaucracy would be tantamount to Russia’s failure.

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Will US pullout from Syria increase risk of conflict with Russia?

The announcement of the US pullout from Syria was received with caution in Moscow. Besides the security and political challenges it may bring about, the Trump decision could mean the end of a practical, relatively constructive US-Russian approach to conflict at flashpoints.


China: How Fragile Is the Giant?

China is Russia's most important and responsible partner in the international arena. The five years that have passed since the beginning of the fundamental complication of relations between Russia and the West have shown that despite prejudices and lack of trust at the grassroots level, relations between the two countries remain friendly.

A Kingdom divided against himself. Special edition

This is a special issue of Russia in Global Affairs, dedicated to this big topic. Thirty years after the end of the Cold War, euphoria over the triumph of liberal ideology, which is “omnipotent because it is true,” has given way to dark pessimism about the future and led to the loss of ideational and moral guidelines.

Common Dreams or Vulgar Delusions? Elite Preoccupations in Discourses about the ‘Commons’

Our age is witness to a proliferation of discourses about the ‘commons’. They are emerging from more and more quarters, and the word is being applied to more things than ever before. One important strand of discourse, claiming to be communist, seeks to apply it to all kinds of spheres, from the earth and its natural bounty to culture, and to all sorts of resources, from the most immaterial, such as common knowledge, to the most material, such as the use of the earth’s finite natural resources. Internet activists refer to information and knowledge that exits on the web as the ‘digital commons’.

Globalization: New Pathways Along the South–South Axis

The year 2018 was marked by escalation in trade tensions among the world’s largest economies, mostly via bilateral trade restrictions.