№ 3 July/September 2006
  • The Russian Season

    Russia’s G8 presidency, which will be crowned by the July summit in St. Petersburg, has become the leitmotif of Russia’s foreign policy this year.

  • Russia, an Engine for Global Development

    Russia should cease playing a game of "catch up" with the so-called developed economies, as well as relinquish the idea of antagonism between Russian and Western interests. Russia and the West objectively need each other.

  • The Russian Economy Today and Tomorrow

    While the problems that Russia must solve in the next three years are quite serious, the long-term challenges are much more fundamental. These challenges include the reduction of the Russian population; the decline in the skill level of manpower resources; the aging of the infrastructure; and the need for sufficient competitive niches in the global division of labor.

  • Asia’s Future and Russia’s Policy

    The formation of Russia’s new policy toward the Asia-Pacific countries is impossible without transforming its foreign-policy thinking, which has been traditionally focused on the Euro-Atlantic space. Russia must stop viewing Asia as something alien.

  • The Rise of Asia, and the Eastern Vector of Russia’s Foreign Policy

    There are necessary prerequisites for adding a new quality to Russia’s mutually advantageous partnership with the Asia-Pacific countries. The recognition of Russia’s importance as a constructive factor in the Asia-Pacific region has brought about markedly new opportunities for regional integration and for consolidating the independent role of the regional states in global politics.

  • U.S.-Russia Relations Through the Prism of Ideology

    The alienation between Washington and Moscow will most likely continue to increase until at least 2009 when new administrations will come to power in both countries. Both the United States and Russia will almost simultaneously launch presidential campaigns in which foreign policy, as a rule, ceases to be an esoteric area dominated by the highbrows and breaks out into a political fist fight.

  • After the Road Map

    Russia’s growing importance in world politics and economy helps it assume a more independent role in international policies in the Middle East. Russia could offer a new diplomatic initiative for scaling down tensions in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. This may occur if it bases its incentive on the principle of ‘demographic disengagement’ of the Israelis and Palestinian Arabs.

  • Azerbaijan – Between America and Iran

    The Iranian issue has divided Azerbaijani society, as shown by frequent public opinion polls. The latest poll showed a fall in the popularity of the United States: only 11 percent placed the U.S. among countries that are the most friendly toward Azerbaijan (compared with 30 percent in 1999).

  • Time to Decide on Russia’s Identity

    The impediments to the implementation of the liberal-democratic project arise not so much from Russia’s cultural-typological differences with the West, as was the case in the early 20th century, as from its historical lag behind the West against the background of the non-essential differences.

  • In Defense of the National Idea

    The formation of Russia’s new national policy is taking place amidst the broadening global crisis concerning the concept of the nation-state, which is instigated by the confrontation between globalization and ethnic separatism. Russia has a unique opportunity to reconsider and reformulate particular values of the nation-state.

  • To Save and Protect

    Political dormancy and indifference have engulfed the Russian people who have turned their energies to the realm of material rather than political ambitions. The consumer boom is rolling through the country, in some places energetically – occasionally even glamorously.

  • History and Myths

    Successful self-identification within the post-Soviet states often involves taking a new look at one’s national history. Not all titular nations in the CIS had states of their own in the past, but all of them had a history on which to build their national self-consciousness.

  • The Evolution of the Russian Diaspora in Independent Ukraine

    In a situation where ethnic Russians are now the lowest caste on the social ladder of Ukrainian society, they are not in the position to uphold their rights in Ukraine on their own. Today, the outlook for the Russian diaspora’s involvement in Ukrainian politics is bleak.

  • Spanish Lessons for Moscow

    Spain’s democratic success poses no miracle prescriptions for Russia and other struggling democracies. But it suggests a point often overlooked in discussions about democratization. Democracy is the product of the skills and talents of real-life political actors rather than the result of some macro-historical process linked to the development of the economy, or the constitutional configuration of civil society and political organizations.

  • Russia’s G8 History: From Guest to President

    Russia’s participation in the G8 has provided the group with a major incentive for confronting a broad range of international political problems involving strategic stability, regional conflicts and nonproliferation. The expansion of summit agendas has given "fresh oxygen" to the dialog between the G8 leaders.

  • The Kremlin at the G8’s Helm: Choosing the Right Steps

    Chairing the G8 meeting in St. Petersburg is an important test of the Kremlin administration’s ability to advance its national interests abroad.
    If Russia engages other members in a substantive discussion of its proposals,
    it will make a significant accomplishment. Comments by Hiski Haukkala and Peter Rutland.

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

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Scaling Down Ambitions? G20 Agenda Evolves from Global Governance to Bilateral Consultations

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Why We Must Prohibit Cyberattacks on Nuclear Systems: the Case for Pre-Emptive US–Russia Arms Control

Almost 35 years ago, US President Ronald Reagan settled down in the White House to watch the latest Hollywood blockbuster WarGames as part of his regular Sunday film night. The film, starring a young Matthew Broderick, depicted a teenage computer hacker accidentally breaking into top-secret Pentagon supercomputers that controlled US nuclear weapons.

Russia’s Response to Sanctions: How Western Sanctions Reshaped Political Economy in Russia

Since August 2017, legislation allowing the imposition of a range of new sanctions against Russia has been passed by US lawmakers. Although not all this legislation has thus far been implemented by the president, Donald Trump, the mere threat of more draconian economic sanctions from the US created considerable uncertainty in Russia.