Board of Advisors

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Ana Anatoly Adamishin
Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs of USSR (1986–1990), First Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs of Russia (1993–1994), Minister of CIS Affairs for Russia (1997–1998). Moscow, Russia.

Olga Butorina
Dr. Sc. (Economics), Professor.  Head of Chair, European Integration Dpt., Advisor to the President, Moscow State University а Foreign Affairs. Moscow, Russia.  

Alexander Filippov
Doctor of Social Science, Full Professor with National Research University–Higher School of Economics, Head of the Center of Fundamental Social Science of the Poletayev Institute of Humanitarian Historical and Theoretical Studies. Moscow, Russia.  

Leonid Grigoriev
Chief advisor to the head of the Analysis Center under the Government of the Russian Federation, Head of the World Economy Chair of the World Economy and International Affairs Department of the National Research University–Higher School of Economics. Moscow, Russia.

Sergey Kravets
Executive Editor of The Great Russian Encyclopedia publishers, Chief of the Religious and Research Center Orthodox Encyclopedia. Moscow, Russia.

Andrey Lankov
PhD in History, Prof., Kookmin University, College of Social Studies. Seoul, Republic of Korea  

Alexander Lomanov
D.Sc. (History), RAS Professor,  Chief Research Fellow (g.n.s.) Primakov National Research Institute of World Economy and International Relations, Russian Academy of Sciences.  

Alexei Miller
Dr. Sc. (History). Professor, European University at Saint-Petersburg.

Yuri Slezkine
Professor of History, Director of the Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. U.S.A.  

Anatoly Vishnevsky
Dr. Sc. (Economics), Director of the Institute of Demography of the State University- Higher School of Economics. Moscow, Russia.

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Will US pullout from Syria increase risk of conflict with Russia?

The announcement of the US pullout from Syria was received with caution in Moscow. Besides the security and political challenges it may bring about, the Trump decision could mean the end of a practical, relatively constructive US-Russian approach to conflict at flashpoints.


Four Dreadful Scenarios for Tomorrow’s Syria and What We Can Do To Avoid Them

Despite eight years of horrific conflict, and over 500,000 thousand deaths, a stable peace in Syria remains elusive.

Russia, Turkey, Iran discuss Syria amid simmering disagreements

The presidents of Russia, Turkey and Iran convened for their fourth summit on Syria in Russia’s southern resort city of Sochi on Feb. 14. Earlier leaders of the “guarantor countries” of the Astana process met in November 2017 in Sochi, in April 2018 in Ankara and in September 2018 in Tehran.

Heartland Reunion: Geopolitical Chimera or Historical Chance?

Anyone who has at least some idea about the theory of international relations should remember the oft-quoted formula put forward by the father of British geopolitics, Halford Mackinder: “Who rules the Heartland commands the World-Island; who rules the World-Island commands the world.”

Indian Approaches to Multilateral Cooperation and Institutions in Eurasia

Relations between the US and Russia are at their worst since the end of the Cold War, China and the US have tense relations, India and China are trying to stabilize relations after a period of acrimony. The major powers appear today to be like the unhappy families in Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina: ‘Each unhappy family (major power in this case) is unhappy in its own way.’

From Mistrust to Solidarity or More Mistrust? Russia’s Migration Experience in the International Context

Freedom of movement and freedom to choose a place of residence can be ranked among the category of freedoms which, as part of the Global Commons, have been restricted to varying degrees at the level of communities, states, and international associations.