Submission and Peer Reviews

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Authors’ Guidelines

We welcome articles on all aspects of political studies, foreign affairs and social and cultural as well as historical studies related to the international relations.

Articles should represent the results of original research, new findings and/or in-depth analysis of the latest trends in the field nominated above.

Recommended size of the article: research article generally should not exceed 35 000 printed characters with spaces (annotation included).

Articles should be composed with respect to the IMRAD principles and should include separate annotation (of 250-400 words), keywords (4-9 words), author(s)’ academic affiliation, contacts and his/her research ID(s).

We are using the Harvard reference system in our journal and cordially ask authors to adhere to its standards. Authors should refrain from page- and/or endnotes. All references to sources and cited materials should follow Harvard practices of referencing.

For the guidelines, please refer to: http://www.citethisforme.com/harvard-referencing (brief guide), OR https://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/files/Harvard_referencing_201718.pdf (DETAILED GUIDE)

For further notice, please, refer to the authors’ submission guideline (in Russian)

Charges

We do not charge neither article submission charges nor article processing charges



Peer Review Process

All articles submitted for the publication are reviewed on the ‘double-blind peer review’ basis. An article, devoid of author’s name, academic title and affiliation (as well as of other references to author’s identity) is sent to a reviewer chosen by the Editorial Board. All in-text references to the author’s identity are temporarily removed from the text and anonymized.

When the Editorial Board collects the review from the peer, it is subsequently anonymized as well and send to the author for consideration. If a peer considers an article worthy of publication yet deserving additional amendments, the author can accept anonymized peer’s comments, remarks and/or criticism and amend his/her text accordingly and then re-submit the article.

If, however, the author does not accept peer’s comments, remarks and/or criticism, the Editorial Board can re-send the article for another review with a different peer.

Ultimately, the Editorial Board will have a final decision over the publication of any article submitted.



Our Peers

To uphold high academic standard of our publication we send submitted articles to the peers we select from the wide range of Russian and international academic institutions.

Among our reviews are the members of the Board of Advisors as well as other prominent experts. Our list of peers includes (but is not limited to):



Samuel Charap, Senior Political Scientist, RAND Corporation, Washington, USA

Andey Karneev, Assistant Professor at the Department of History of China, Institute of Asian anв African Studies, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia

Ivan Krastev, chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies in Sofia, Bulgaria, and permanent fellow at the IWM Institute of Human Sciences in Vienna

Andrej Krickovic, Assistant Professor at Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia

Vasiliy Kuznetsov, Head of Arabic and Islamic Studies Center at Institute of Oriental Studies of the Russian Academy of Science, Moscow, Russia

Peter Paul Anatol Lieven, professor at the campus of Georgetown University in Doha, Qatar and a visiting professor in the War Studies Department of King’s College London. Her is also a senior fellow of the New America Foundation in Washington D.C.

Pyotr Stegniy, Full professor of history, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia.

Lanxin Xiang, Director, Centre of One Belt and One Road Studies, China National Institute for SCO International Exchange and Judicial Cooperation, The Graduate Institute Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

Yuval Weber, Postdoctoral Fellow at Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University, Washington, U.S.A.

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Will US pullout from Syria increase risk of conflict with Russia?

The announcement of the US pullout from Syria was received with caution in Moscow. Besides the security and political challenges it may bring about, the Trump decision could mean the end of a practical, relatively constructive US-Russian approach to conflict at flashpoints.


Four Dreadful Scenarios for Tomorrow’s Syria and What We Can Do To Avoid Them

Despite eight years of horrific conflict, and over 500,000 thousand deaths, a stable peace in Syria remains elusive.

Russia, Turkey, Iran discuss Syria amid simmering disagreements

The presidents of Russia, Turkey and Iran convened for their fourth summit on Syria in Russia’s southern resort city of Sochi on Feb. 14. Earlier leaders of the “guarantor countries” of the Astana process met in November 2017 in Sochi, in April 2018 in Ankara and in September 2018 in Tehran.

Heartland Reunion: Geopolitical Chimera or Historical Chance?

Anyone who has at least some idea about the theory of international relations should remember the oft-quoted formula put forward by the father of British geopolitics, Halford Mackinder: “Who rules the Heartland commands the World-Island; who rules the World-Island commands the world.”

Indian Approaches to Multilateral Cooperation and Institutions in Eurasia

Relations between the US and Russia are at their worst since the end of the Cold War, China and the US have tense relations, India and China are trying to stabilize relations after a period of acrimony. The major powers appear today to be like the unhappy families in Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina: ‘Each unhappy family (major power in this case) is unhappy in its own way.’

From Mistrust to Solidarity or More Mistrust? Russia’s Migration Experience in the International Context

Freedom of movement and freedom to choose a place of residence can be ranked among the category of freedoms which, as part of the Global Commons, have been restricted to varying degrees at the level of communities, states, and international associations.