All articles
Arkady Dubnov

Arkady Dubnov is a political analyst at Moskovskiye Novosti newspaper.

  • 7 october 2012

    Tashkent Goes, Problems Stay

    (1)

    Uzbekistan’s withdrawal makes one think of a more general problem – the artificiality of the entire structure of military-political security, built around Russia. In fact, the CSTO is now a mechanical combination of three security systems, each based on Russian participation.

  • 22 june 2011

    The Last Mirage of Durability

    References to the Moslem periphery of the former Soviet empire sprang up during the peak of events in Tunisia and Egypt. All of the characteristics of North African countries – authoritarian (at best, but in most cases totalitarian) regimes that have ruled for decades; nepotism, corruption and contempt for human rights; extreme poverty, unemployment and the lack of a social security net – can be easily applied to Central Asian reality.

  • 9 april 2010

    “L’Etat, C’Est Lui!”

    Islam Karimov has never made a secret of the fact that he does not separate the notions of ‘Uzbekistan’ and ‘President.’ Karimov’s brainchild has gone through numerous harsh tests over the past two decades but now it is facing the harshest one. The challenges are too momentous to be matched by the experience of Soviet-era nomenklatura, even the one bolstered by the nationalistic aspirations that always go hand-in-glove with the construction of a new statehood.

  • 9 august 2008

    OSCE Battlefield

    The Kazakh path toward chairmanship of the largest European organization has been full of twists and turns and it reflects not so much the rise of the country’s national statehood, as the rivalry between Russia and the West for energy resources in the Caspian basin and Central Asia, plus the competition between Moscow and the Kazakh government for positions in energy markets and in the territory of the former Soviet Union.

  • 10 august 2004

    Afghanistan Under Lease

    The Americans had no illusions about the Afghan mojaheds from the very start, and extremely simplistic people only could hope in earnest that they could become the heralds of Afghan democracy. As an Afghan once formulated: "One cannot buy us out, one can only lease us for a while".

1
Archives
Choose year
Choose issue
Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Russia-Japan -- peace can wait

Putin has snubbed Abe as he boosts links with China amid growing US hostility to Beijing and Moscow.


Political Crisis in France: Locked by Elites

We entered a political crisis. The incidents of Saturday, November 1, the evolution of claims and slogans of the Yellow Vests prove it.

Crimea and Punishment

On 25 November, Russia seized 24 Ukrainian sailors in the Kerch Strait, which connects the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. It is the first open clash between the two countries since 2014.

Scaling Down Ambitions? G20 Agenda Evolves from Global Governance to Bilateral Consultations

The fate of the G20 is an example of how difficult it is in the modern world to establish any formalized forms of international or global governance. Despite the fact that problems are increasingly truly global in nature, their solution is becoming increasingly national. States do their due for their own citizens and, as a rule, do not take into account the interests of mankind as a whole.

Why We Must Prohibit Cyberattacks on Nuclear Systems: the Case for Pre-Emptive US–Russia Arms Control

Almost 35 years ago, US President Ronald Reagan settled down in the White House to watch the latest Hollywood blockbuster WarGames as part of his regular Sunday film night. The film, starring a young Matthew Broderick, depicted a teenage computer hacker accidentally breaking into top-secret Pentagon supercomputers that controlled US nuclear weapons.

Russia’s Response to Sanctions: How Western Sanctions Reshaped Political Economy in Russia

Since August 2017, legislation allowing the imposition of a range of new sanctions against Russia has been passed by US lawmakers. Although not all this legislation has thus far been implemented by the president, Donald Trump, the mere threat of more draconian economic sanctions from the US created considerable uncertainty in Russia.