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Fyodor Lukyanov

Fyodor Lukyanov is Editor-in-Chief of Russia in Global Affairs, Chairman of the Presidium of the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy, and Research Director of the Valdai International Discussion Club. Research Professor, Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow.

  • 7 february 2006

    After the Empire

    This year will mark 15 years since the breakup of the Soviet Union, a dramatic event whose aftermath will determine the course of world history for a long time.

  • 21 november 2005

    Passions Over Sovereignty

    Of the many subjects of political debate in Russia in 2005, the main emphasis has been on national sovereignty.

  • 30 july 2005

    Debates About Values

    Thirty years ago, on August 1, 1975, the leaders of 35 countries gathered in Helsinki to sign the Final Act of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe.

  • 18 may 2005

    In Search of New Identity

    Russia is marking two anniversaries this spring that are of fundamental importance for its development.

  • 8 february 2005

    The Spiral of Russian History

    The year 2004 has proven to be Russian President Vladimir Putin’s most difficult year since he took office in 2000. Apart from an upsurge in terrorism, which culminated in the horrible terrorist act in Beslan, Putin faced a decrease in economic growth rates, the declining position of Moscow in the post-Soviet space, and a marked deterioration in the West’s attitude toward Moscow.

  • 25 november 2004

    Victorious Ukraine

    The preliminary outcome of the battle shows that Ukraine is a complicated and subtle political system that does not deserve a simplified approach.

  • 9 november 2004

    Russia Goes to War

    Following the recent hostage drama in Beslan, where hundreds of schoolchildren were brutally killed by terrorists, we must ask the question: “What kind of country has Russia become?”

  • 9 november 2004

    Imperial Overload

    The Kremlin has earmarked enormous resources to ensure Viktor Yanukovich’s victory in Ukraine’s presidential election, in order to prove that Russia still has influence in the post-Soviet republic, and not because it would actually benefit from that win.

  • 9 september 2004

    The Eternal Value of Autocracy

    Differences in the interpretation of the Beslan hostage drama by Russia and the West could well drive a wedge between the two sides, reducing relations to their lowest point since the demise of the Soviet empire.

  • 16 august 2004

    No Rose Is Without a Thorn

    There already was a Georgian president who failed to live up to his own popularity and subsequently drove his country into the abyss.

  • 10 august 2004

    Gone with the Wind of Change

    Fifteen years ago, in the early summer of 1989, the entire Soviet nation was glued to the television, not believing its eyes. At that time, the country held its first Congress of People’s Deputies of the Soviet Union, and it was then that public politics first arose in Russia.

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Normandy Four summit on Ukraine’s future: What’s at stake?

Paris is set to host the first summit of the so-called Normandy Four in over three years. The rendezvous is possible thanks to a change of power in Ukraine and a very active stance by Macron. What are the stakeholders’ cards?


How Cozy Is Russia and China’s Military Relationship?

Russia and China’s strategic military cooperation is becoming ever closer. President Putin has announced that Russia is helping China build an early warning system to spot intercontinental ballistic missile launches.

A “Synchronized Downturn” Calls for a “Synchronized Response”

This year’s Annual meetings of the IMF and the World Bank in Washington DC revealed a growing preoccupation with the mounting signs of a slowdown in the world economy.

How to Stop NATO

Catherine the Great is credited with saying that the only way to secure the borders of the Russian Empire is to expand them continuously. This logic is to some degree applicable to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, which embarked on a path of geographical enlargement quite literally from the very first days of its existence.

Developing the Far East and Chinese-Russian Relations: New Perceptions and New Practices

Developing the Russian Far East and Siberia has been an important step in state-building for Russia. Although there have been debates about appropriate ideas and policies in the strategy, developing the vast frontier region and promoting relations with Asian countries has set a steadfast direction of development for Russia. Chinese-Russian cooperation in the border region during the early stages of imperial Russia’s policies in the Far East holds enlightening significance for today’s bilateral cooperation.

Japan and the Development of the Russian Far East

The main objective for the Shinzo Abe administration’s active engagement in supporting the involvement of Japanese companies in the development of the Russian Far East is to create favourable environment for resolution of the territorial issue and conclusion of a peace treaty with Russia. Japan–Russia cooperation in the Russian Far East is part of Abe’s 8-point cooperation plan with Moscow.