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Konstantin Kosachev

Konstantin Kosachev is Head of the Federal Agency for the Commonwealth of Independent States, Compatriots Living Abroad and International Humanitarian Cooperation (Rossotrudnichestvo). He is also the Russian President’s Special Envoy for Relations with CIS Member-States and a Member of the Editorial Board of Russia in Global Affairs.

  • 27 december 2012

    Re-Exporting Values

    Georgia has entered a new political era that will show how much the “rose revolutionaries” have managed to achieve. Have they laid the foundation for new developments that will endure in a new social environment or is their activity mere labeling and blowing bubbles? In any case, the experience will be instructive.

  • 7 october 2012

    The Specifics of Russian Soft Power

    Direct benefits from participation in integration projects with Russia most often outweigh “birds in the bush,” promised “at the end of a long journey,” after the aspirant has fulfilled an endless and arbitrarily changed list of conditions.

  • 27 march 2011

    Three Birds with One Stone?

    The discussions about Russia’s possible membership in NATO, although not followed up on, once again have created an opportunity to probe positions and see certain changes in the opinions of a growing number of politicians, above all in Europe. These discussions have also prompted people to look at this issue from a more specific point of view: “If Russia cannot join NATO, then why?”

  • 9 april 2010

    Values for the Sake of Unification

    It is clear that no European security model will work without NATO or on the basis of NATO alone – even if all countries from Vancouver to Vladivostok are admitted to NATO.

  • 17 november 2007

    Russia and the West: Where the Differences Lie

    When Russia stands firm in upholding its interests, or shows evidence of its independence in conduct and thinking, it is treated in the West as a signal for ideological attacks. Conflict of values is a matter of propaganda, rather than ideological, civilizational or psychological realities.

  • 8 may 2006

    A Dictatorship of Incompetence

    If the West would give up its attitude toward Russia, which is based on the “presumption of guilt” principle, this would enable the former to concentrate on truly pressing, relevant problems, such as the blackmail being waged by politically unstable transit states, as well as Europe’s growing dependency on political opportunists.

  • 10 august 2004

    Russian Foreign Policy Vertical

    Today Russia possesses unique opportunities for switching from a policy of response to to a policy of initiation when considering international events. But to take avail of these opportunities, Russia must adjust its foreign policy mechanism.

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Will US pullout from Syria increase risk of conflict with Russia?

The announcement of the US pullout from Syria was received with caution in Moscow. Besides the security and political challenges it may bring about, the Trump decision could mean the end of a practical, relatively constructive US-Russian approach to conflict at flashpoints.


Escape from responsibility: the U.S. is looking for a way out of Afghanistan

In the context of ongoing negotiations between the Taliban and the United States, the vigilance of all parties involved in the Afghan conflict is growing.

Moscow cultivates neutral image as Libya quakes

Russia’s deputy foreign minister and Putin’s special envoy for the MENA region, Mikhail Bogdanov, received a phone call April 6 from Gen. Khalifa Hifter, the commander of the Libyan National Army (LNA).

Firewood and Coal: U.S.–Russia Relations without Mueller

The completion of the Mueller investigation ended with the deafening defeat of the opponents of the incumbent President of the United States.

Indian Approaches to Multilateral Cooperation and Institutions in Eurasia

Relations between the US and Russia are at their worst since the end of the Cold War, China and the US have tense relations, India and China are trying to stabilize relations after a period of acrimony. The major powers appear today to be like the unhappy families in Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina: ‘Each unhappy family (major power in this case) is unhappy in its own way.’

From Mistrust to Solidarity or More Mistrust? Russia’s Migration Experience in the International Context

Freedom of movement and freedom to choose a place of residence can be ranked among the category of freedoms which, as part of the Global Commons, have been restricted to varying degrees at the level of communities, states, and international associations.