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Sergei Dubinin

Sergei Dubinin is a Professor and has a Doctoral Degree in Economics.

  • 25 december 2017

    Breaking Out of the Vicious Circle

    Everything seems to have changed in Russia over the past one hundred years. The social and economic systems were scrapped and built anew twice, and the political system was overhauled three times. Yet the answers to the main questions “Who is to blame?” and “What is to be done?” remain pretty much the same as before.

  • 15 april 2013

    And Still It Turns – Around Money

    (1)

    It is the common wealth, or the accumulated and permanently growing public wealth that has real significance. A growing national economy as such is a factor of attraction. Broadening markets promise lucrative contracts to any economic partner.

  • 27 december 2012

    Shaky Stability

    The Russian economy’s preparedness for the world economic growth slowdown cannot be rated on the basis of the reserves accumulated by the state. A reliable mechanism of generating savings and transforming them into investments and competitive projects in the national economy is a vital need.

  • 24 september 2011

    Time for Financial Repression

    (1)

    The Russian authorities have succeeded in easing the consequences of the economic and financial crisis of 2008-2009 for the population. At the same time, the crisis has exposed structural weaknesses of the Russian economy. The stabilization of economic growth and revenue in the first decade of the 21st cen- tury did not lay the groundwork for long-term development.

  • 15 october 2010

    Together But Not In Sync

    The developing economies are prepared to join the ranks of key players on the financial markets by strengthening their national market infrastructures; that is, by setting up new financial centers on the basis of their banking systems and stock exchanges, and by diversifying debt securities markets. Shanghai, Dubai and Moscow are new generation centers, to name just a few.

  • 16 november 2008

    A New Entente

    The time has come to discuss methods of international regulation. From an objective point of view, the United States, in crisis conditions, should not be interested in stepping up military-political competition in the world arena, but in productive cooperation, including with Russia.

  • 7 february 2006

    The Fruits of a Hundred Years Revolution

    Chaos, as a general rule, occurs in the most authoritarian overcentralized states, in which the breakdown of central authority causes the collapse of local authority. This pattern is observed in the early 20th century both in the Russian and Chinese Empires; the juggernaut of state administration weakens and literally falls to pieces.

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Will US pullout from Syria increase risk of conflict with Russia?

The announcement of the US pullout from Syria was received with caution in Moscow. Besides the security and political challenges it may bring about, the Trump decision could mean the end of a practical, relatively constructive US-Russian approach to conflict at flashpoints.


Russia eyes big picture with S-400 sale to Turkey

ussia's controversial S-400 deal with Turkey is more about constructing a Middle East less dependent on the United States than direct competition.

Trump’s Trade Wars, Asia, and Russia

The key question with regard to US-China relations overall is whether the US business community, which has been until recently the foundation of US domestic support for the China relations, feels more able to do business.

Communication Lines in Diplomacy: Expanding the Possibility Set

The problem with communication in today’s world may be the illusion that real communication is taking place and no additional lines of communication are necessary. The truth of the matter is that there is still sizeable potential to raise the “technological capacity” in international diplomatic communication to a higher level via allocating the “frequency bandwidth” to regional blocks and other stakeholders.

Common Dreams or Vulgar Delusions? Elite Preoccupations in Discourses about the ‘Commons’

Our age is witness to a proliferation of discourses about the ‘commons’. They are emerging from more and more quarters, and the word is being applied to more things than ever before. One important strand of discourse, claiming to be communist, seeks to apply it to all kinds of spheres, from the earth and its natural bounty to culture, and to all sorts of resources, from the most immaterial, such as common knowledge, to the most material, such as the use of the earth’s finite natural resources. Internet activists refer to information and knowledge that exits on the web as the ‘digital commons’.

Globalization: New Pathways Along the South–South Axis

The year 2018 was marked by escalation in trade tensions among the world’s largest economies, mostly via bilateral trade restrictions.