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Carl Bildt

Carl Bildt was Sweden’s foreign minister from 2006 to October 2014 and Prime Minister from 1991 to 1994, when he negotiated Sweden’s EU accession.

  • 24 january 2018

    Securing the Digital Transition

    Within a few decades, the Internet has transformed the global economy and rendered the old Westphalian order increasingly obsolete. But without a new governance framework to manage cyber threats and abuses, what has been a boon to globalization could become its undoing.

  • 15 december 2017

    Can Europe Sustain the Macron Moment?

    The European Union's political and economic outlook improved dramatically in 2017, following a year in which the bloc reeled from the United Kingdom's Brexit referendum and Donald Trump's election in the United States. But European leaders must not become complacent in 2018, or the EU could be thrown into crisis yet again the following year.

  • 17 february 2004

    Europe Puzzled by Recent Developments in Russia

    The year 2004 is likely to become a watershed year in terms of the increased development of what is referred to as Wider Europe – a community of countries united by their close geographical proximity, shared history and cultural values. To understand what our common future will be like, it is necessary to answer one critical question: Where is Russia heading? Many in the West are questioning whether there has been a change in the direction of the development of Russia, and what consequences this change would have for its relations with the outside world.

  • 20 june 2003

    Political Duty of Bringing Russia Back to the European Fold

    Russia and the EU are facing many problems, both global and regional, which they can solve only by pooling together their efforts. However, the political dialog between Moscow and Brussels has been remarkably empty, considering that the solution to these vexing problems is vital to both parties.

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Will US pullout from Syria increase risk of conflict with Russia?

The announcement of the US pullout from Syria was received with caution in Moscow. Besides the security and political challenges it may bring about, the Trump decision could mean the end of a practical, relatively constructive US-Russian approach to conflict at flashpoints.


Escape from responsibility: the U.S. is looking for a way out of Afghanistan

In the context of ongoing negotiations between the Taliban and the United States, the vigilance of all parties involved in the Afghan conflict is growing.

Moscow cultivates neutral image as Libya quakes

Russia’s deputy foreign minister and Putin’s special envoy for the MENA region, Mikhail Bogdanov, received a phone call April 6 from Gen. Khalifa Hifter, the commander of the Libyan National Army (LNA).

Firewood and Coal: U.S.–Russia Relations without Mueller

The completion of the Mueller investigation ended with the deafening defeat of the opponents of the incumbent President of the United States.

Indian Approaches to Multilateral Cooperation and Institutions in Eurasia

Relations between the US and Russia are at their worst since the end of the Cold War, China and the US have tense relations, India and China are trying to stabilize relations after a period of acrimony. The major powers appear today to be like the unhappy families in Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina: ‘Each unhappy family (major power in this case) is unhappy in its own way.’

From Mistrust to Solidarity or More Mistrust? Russia’s Migration Experience in the International Context

Freedom of movement and freedom to choose a place of residence can be ranked among the category of freedoms which, as part of the Global Commons, have been restricted to varying degrees at the level of communities, states, and international associations.