All articles
Vladislav Inozemtsev

Vladislav Inozemtsev holds a PhD in Economics; he is Head of the Department of World Economy at the Faculty of Public Administration, Lomonosov Moscow State University, and Director of the Center for Post-Industrial Studies.

  • 21 march 2014

    Eurozone: A Recipe for Recovery

    The euro is a young currency that has all chances to make Europe a global player if the problems associated with its “premature birth” are solved in a decisive manner. The fiscal authorities should resort to extraordinary measures in order to accelerate economic growth, reduce unemployment, and boost the continent’s competitiveness.

  • 30 june 2013

    Colonies vs. Dependencies: An Invitation to a Discourse

    It would be more logical to recognize only settler colonies as colonies per se and refer to all other results of expansion as dependencies. The loss of colonies is incomparably more dangerous for empires than the loss of dependencies. Trying to hold on to dependencies is meaningless, but to neglect the colonies is reckless.

  • 27 december 2012

    Continent Siberia

    (5)

    Siberia should re-evaluate its place and role, and start developing itself as an element of the global economy, similar to what the eastern U.S. states did several decades ago and China’s coastal provinces did recently.

  • 29 december 2011

    The Remaking of the Industrial World

    Illusory hopes that new technological possibilities will help create unlimited wealth have never come true. No invention can ensure a life of ease for decades. Of course, the world has changed – but, as the developments of recent years have shown, not to an extent that the established economic patterns should be discarded as worthless. The 21st-century world is a renewed yet still industrial world.

  • 25 december 2010

    Nineteen Eighty-Five

    (1)

    The Soviet Union, contrary to many expectations, survived the year 1984 – one of the last years of the industrial age. But it proved helpless in the new conditions, when the development of post-industrial countries demanded greater flexibility and innovation from the rest of the world. As for Russia, over the years since the end of the Soviet era, it has grown, it looks, richer somewhat, but its basic features have remained Soviet all along.

  • 5 september 2009

    The Post-Crisis World: Searching for a New Framework

    This century will be neither “American” nor “North Atlantic” – but neither the Americans nor the Europeans or the Russians are interested in seeing the 21st century becoming “Asian” and especially “Chinese.” Today as never before all of them need unity.

  • 7 june 2009

    A Not-So-Great Depression

    A majority of economic institutions in the world today are in a sort of stupor after the powerful blow the crisis delivered in the third and fourth quarters of 2008. But this does not imply that the post-crisis rebound will not be as surprising as the crisis.

  • 8 august 2007

    Russia Today: Up the Down Staircase

    The year 2008 will be problematic because the bureaucratic class is divided. One part of the bureaucracy, which has gained control over substantial assets, is ready in principle to formally change the image of bureaucrats for the status of businessmen.

  • 11 february 2007

    Europe as the "Center", and Its "Outskirts"

    Europe is gradually turning into a kind of a community of personalities, whereas the United States and Russia are consolidating a society of citizens (or even subjects).

  • 8 february 2006

    Michael Walzer: "Any Ruler Can Be Brought to the Law"

    The trial of Hussein who claimed to
    be a ruler, who could do essentially anything and whose rule was arbitrary, was to bring him to the law, before the court, but to respect all of the civilized procedural rules.

  • 8 february 2006

    Two Faces of Globalization: Europeanization Vs Americanization

    We all are entering a new era in which the Europeans may peacefully live in their united Europe, and the Americans may build their beloved America according to their own projects. But this will be possible only if America and Europe let the rest of the world follow the path of genuine globalization, that is, let each nation and people follow its own course.

  • 21 november 2005

    Fernando Henrique Cardoso: "We Need More Democracy to Tame Markets"

    You can compare globalization with the beginning of industrialization in Europe in the early 19th century when the workers were prepared to break the machinery because they were against it. To be against globalization is a similar situation, to some extent. If Karl Marx were still alive he would say: "You people are crazy. This is the means to progress."

  • 18 may 2005

    The Convenient Enemy

    The "war on terror" will soon outpace World War II in terms of its scale and duration. Because the ruling elites of all the countries involved, without exception – the United States, Russia, Great Britain, Poland and many others – are vitally interested in it.

  • 1 december 2003

    Rethinking the New World Order

    We can say with certainty that what we are witnessing today is a world disorder, to which almost all members of the international community are now contributing, together with numerous illegal networks and organizations. The world is slipping into chaos. The crisis within the system of international relations now seems obvious, and the only way of resolving it is to create an altogether new world order.

  • 17 may 2003

    Out of Touch with Reality

    Two new Russian books on globalization, one written under the auspices of the Gorbachev Foundation and the other by Russian Communist leader Gennady Zyuganov, evoke rather questionable thoughts concerning the ability of the Russian intellectual elite to propose viable models for Russia’s development in the modern world.

  • 26 march 2003

    Anti-Americanism: Is It Europe’s Obsession?

    At a time when the Old World does not conceal its irritation with the United States, Jean-FranНois Revel, a patriarch of the French intellectual tradition, comes out in America’s support.

  • 16 november 2002

    Coming Closer to the Truth

    “The vast majority of Muslims are not terrorists, but the vast majority of terrorists are Muslims,” – notes Dinesh D’Souza in his new book.

1
Archives
Choose year
Choose issue
Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Will US pullout from Syria increase risk of conflict with Russia?

The announcement of the US pullout from Syria was received with caution in Moscow. Besides the security and political challenges it may bring about, the Trump decision could mean the end of a practical, relatively constructive US-Russian approach to conflict at flashpoints.


Russia has 3 messages for Turkey over operation in Syria

Russia has its eye on long-term opportunities following Turkey's operation in northeast Syria.

The East’s Rise and the New Russian Foreign Policy

Russia is bracing to turn from its centuries-old foreign policy model (dating back to the Moscow Principality) to maintain direct control over its immediate periphery as a way to provide for its security. How new self-defense methods get integrated into the nation’s strategic culture can play a crucial role in the future.

Russian Interests in the Context of the Iranian-Saudi Crisis

Provocations benefit everyone. They allow strong states to express anger, reaffirm their supremacy, and to even use force but without resorting to war.

Developing the Far East and Chinese-Russian Relations: New Perceptions and New Practices

Developing the Russian Far East and Siberia has been an important step in state-building for Russia. Although there have been debates about appropriate ideas and policies in the strategy, developing the vast frontier region and promoting relations with Asian countries has set a steadfast direction of development for Russia. Chinese-Russian cooperation in the border region during the early stages of imperial Russia’s policies in the Far East holds enlightening significance for today’s bilateral cooperation.

Japan and the Development of the Russian Far East

The main objective for the Shinzo Abe administration’s active engagement in supporting the involvement of Japanese companies in the development of the Russian Far East is to create favourable environment for resolution of the territorial issue and conclusion of a peace treaty with Russia. Japan–Russia cooperation in the Russian Far East is part of Abe’s 8-point cooperation plan with Moscow.