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Emil Pain

Emil Pain is professor at the National Research University–Higher School of Economics; General Director of the Center for Ethno-Political Studies. He holds a Doctorate in Political Science.

  • 30 june 2013

    Nations, Civic Nationalism and Democracy

    Ethnic nationalism cannot be a strategic ally of the forces interested in Russia’s modernization. Realizing the impossibility of a purely elitist modernization, these forces will inevitably need mass support and national consolidation. Consequently, they will need nationalism, although of a different strain – the civic one.

  • 27 december 2012

    Can Democracy Counteract Xenophobia?

    Notwithstanding Russia’s specificity, it is high time to remove religion from federal authority and include religious communities in the system of institutions that constitute civil society.

  • 27 march 2011

    The Decline of Multiculturalism

    The Russian version of the multiculturalism policy is older and more complex in terms of its consequences than the European one. Multiculturalism as a form of promoting group and communal identity was an integral part of Stalin’s policy of creating ethnic republics, as well as ethnic areas and regions.

  • 15 june 2008

    Russia – A Society Without Traditions Facing Modern Challenges

    Any hopes to resolve the problems facing Russia today by derelict methods of state mobilization are a sheer illusion. Russia has lost its traditionalism and the goal it faces today is not so much to move forward, but, rather, to restore a balance between the elements of state and society that have already been reformed and those that still remain intact. It cannot be ruled out that ethnic consolidation in Russia could open up the road to the rise of a political nation – the way it happened in most European countries.

  • 18 may 2005

    Will Russia Transform Into a Nationalist Empire?

    The peculiarities of Russia’s transformation and the essence of its unique development can be best understood from the position of its imperial past and present. In contrast to Central and East European countries, Russia cannot run away from the empire as it would from an external enemy; the empire complex can only be removed through its own efforts.

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Will US pullout from Syria increase risk of conflict with Russia?

The announcement of the US pullout from Syria was received with caution in Moscow. Besides the security and political challenges it may bring about, the Trump decision could mean the end of a practical, relatively constructive US-Russian approach to conflict at flashpoints.


Escape from responsibility: the U.S. is looking for a way out of Afghanistan

In the context of ongoing negotiations between the Taliban and the United States, the vigilance of all parties involved in the Afghan conflict is growing.

Moscow cultivates neutral image as Libya quakes

Russia’s deputy foreign minister and Putin’s special envoy for the MENA region, Mikhail Bogdanov, received a phone call April 6 from Gen. Khalifa Hifter, the commander of the Libyan National Army (LNA).

Firewood and Coal: U.S.–Russia Relations without Mueller

The completion of the Mueller investigation ended with the deafening defeat of the opponents of the incumbent President of the United States.

Indian Approaches to Multilateral Cooperation and Institutions in Eurasia

Relations between the US and Russia are at their worst since the end of the Cold War, China and the US have tense relations, India and China are trying to stabilize relations after a period of acrimony. The major powers appear today to be like the unhappy families in Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina: ‘Each unhappy family (major power in this case) is unhappy in its own way.’

From Mistrust to Solidarity or More Mistrust? Russia’s Migration Experience in the International Context

Freedom of movement and freedom to choose a place of residence can be ranked among the category of freedoms which, as part of the Global Commons, have been restricted to varying degrees at the level of communities, states, and international associations.