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Leonid Grigoriev

Leonid Grigoriev is chief advisor to the head of the Analysis Center under the Government of the Russian Federation, Head of the World Economy Chair of the World Economy and International Affairs Department of the National Research University–Higher School of Economics.

  • 7 june 2014

    Socio-Economic Crisis in Ukraine: Why and What’s Next?

    Ukraine’s main chance of entering Europe not as a source of labor force, but as a moderately developed industrialized country will be to go ahead with exports to Russia and other countries where Ukrainian manufactures are in demand.

  • 26 december 2013

    Property and Law

    Russia is in a precarious position: although formally enshrined in legislation, quite legal private property very often is not considered to be legitimate. The “unfair” procedures that brought about the emergence of mammoth private wealth during the privatization period breeds distrust in the authorities, the laws it adopts, and the measures it takes.

  • 30 june 2013

    Different Economies, Similar Problems

    The interaction within BRICS has drawn a variety of comments – from sarcasm to the expectation of miracles. But the aggravation of problems with the sustainability of global development in 2008-2013 has brought the role of those states into the limelight to show that global decisions will not be necessarily found inside Bretton-Woods institutions or the OECD.

  • 20 december 2009

    Financial Architecture: Urgent Repair

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    Russia’s role in the world financial architecture is unlikely to be as significant as many would wish it to be, but given sensible alliances and compromises, it may become quite sufficient for protecting its national interests. The current situation should be used to modernize Russia’s own financial system, increase its resistance to external shocks, and its ability to convert internal savings into domestic investments in development.

  • 2 march 2008

    Russian Modernization: Interests and Coalitions

    Attempts to overcome a serious crisis and launch the process of modernization can be compared to trying to climb out of a deep well. Neither the state, nor business nor civil society can climb out on its own. The three forces will only be able to move upward if they realize that they must pool their efforts to transform the country – keeping in mind that they should not climb over each other, or they will fall back down into the well.

  • 13 october 2006

    Uncompleted Transition

    Inherent weaknesses of the newly independent countries include not only high social costs and poor product quality, but also a shortage of managerial capital with the experience and abilities required to successfully compete on the global market.

  • 8 may 2006

    Ukraine – Growth and Gas

    The intricate overlapping of economic ties, corporate relations and political problems has made the issue of Gazprom’s relations with gas consumers in the CIS countries very difficult, and here we have an interesting case where the Russian side is objectively interested in depoliticizing economic relations.

  • 21 november 2005

    Statehood: The Regional Dimension

    Russia clearly needs to rely on a couple dozen big and prosperous cities capable of developing rapidly in some key areas. These cities are located especially near seas and oceans, and at communication hubs in important border areas. It is equally important that they have a business and political elite with a sense of local patriotism; individuals who are not prepared to jump ship and move to Moscow at any moment, while sending their offspring abroad with the bulk of their capital.

  • 18 may 2005

    Russia’s Place in the Global Economy

    Issues involving the development and modernization of the Russian economy came to the forefront of public debate as Russia recorded its fifth consecutive year of economic growth. Russia has extensive resources but few variants for using them.

  • 17 may 2003

    Looking Into the Future

    Russia and Europe are now economically more dependent upon each other than ever before. For the first time, energy imports have become very vital for the European economy, and this importance will continue growing in the future. Russia, the main supplier of energy resources to the EU, is no less dependent on Europe

  • 16 november 2002

    The 21st Century: Diverging Paths of Development

    The developing world, now Russia included, will not catch up with the developed countries. At the turn of the millennium the growth rates of the three main groups of states evened up. This means that the gap between them is being preserved rather than narrowed and that their drawing closer together is practically impossible. The chance to make a breakthrough by channeling the resources made available by the end of the Cold War was lost. .

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Publisher's column

A new world order: A view from Russia

Since around 2017–2018, the world has been living through a period of progressive erosion, or collapse, of international orders inherited from the past. With the election of Donald Trump and the rapid increase of US containment of Russia and China—which is both a consequence of this gradual erosion and also represents deep internal and international contradictions—this process entered its apogee.

Editor's column

Will US pullout from Syria increase risk of conflict with Russia?

The announcement of the US pullout from Syria was received with caution in Moscow. Besides the security and political challenges it may bring about, the Trump decision could mean the end of a practical, relatively constructive US-Russian approach to conflict at flashpoints.


China: How Fragile Is the Giant?

China is Russia's most important and responsible partner in the international arena. The five years that have passed since the beginning of the fundamental complication of relations between Russia and the West have shown that despite prejudices and lack of trust at the grassroots level, relations between the two countries remain friendly.

A Kingdom divided against himself. Special edition

This is a special issue of Russia in Global Affairs, dedicated to this big topic. Thirty years after the end of the Cold War, euphoria over the triumph of liberal ideology, which is “omnipotent because it is true,” has given way to dark pessimism about the future and led to the loss of ideational and moral guidelines.

Common Dreams or Vulgar Delusions? Elite Preoccupations in Discourses about the ‘Commons’

Our age is witness to a proliferation of discourses about the ‘commons’. They are emerging from more and more quarters, and the word is being applied to more things than ever before. One important strand of discourse, claiming to be communist, seeks to apply it to all kinds of spheres, from the earth and its natural bounty to culture, and to all sorts of resources, from the most immaterial, such as common knowledge, to the most material, such as the use of the earth’s finite natural resources. Internet activists refer to information and knowledge that exits on the web as the ‘digital commons’.

Globalization: New Pathways Along the South–South Axis

The year 2018 was marked by escalation in trade tensions among the world’s largest economies, mostly via bilateral trade restrictions.