All articles
Leonid Grigoriev

Leonid Grigoriev is chief advisor to the head of the Analysis Center under the Government of the Russian Federation, Head of the World Economy Chair of the World Economy and International Affairs Department of the National Research University–Higher School of Economics.

  • 7 june 2014

    Socio-Economic Crisis in Ukraine: Why and What’s Next?

    Ukraine’s main chance of entering Europe not as a source of labor force, but as a moderately developed industrialized country will be to go ahead with exports to Russia and other countries where Ukrainian manufactures are in demand.

  • 26 december 2013

    Property and Law

    Russia is in a precarious position: although formally enshrined in legislation, quite legal private property very often is not considered to be legitimate. The “unfair” procedures that brought about the emergence of mammoth private wealth during the privatization period breeds distrust in the authorities, the laws it adopts, and the measures it takes.

  • 30 june 2013

    Different Economies, Similar Problems

    The interaction within BRICS has drawn a variety of comments – from sarcasm to the expectation of miracles. But the aggravation of problems with the sustainability of global development in 2008-2013 has brought the role of those states into the limelight to show that global decisions will not be necessarily found inside Bretton-Woods institutions or the OECD.

  • 20 december 2009

    Financial Architecture: Urgent Repair

    (11)

    Russia’s role in the world financial architecture is unlikely to be as significant as many would wish it to be, but given sensible alliances and compromises, it may become quite sufficient for protecting its national interests. The current situation should be used to modernize Russia’s own financial system, increase its resistance to external shocks, and its ability to convert internal savings into domestic investments in development.

  • 2 march 2008

    Russian Modernization: Interests and Coalitions

    Attempts to overcome a serious crisis and launch the process of modernization can be compared to trying to climb out of a deep well. Neither the state, nor business nor civil society can climb out on its own. The three forces will only be able to move upward if they realize that they must pool their efforts to transform the country – keeping in mind that they should not climb over each other, or they will fall back down into the well.

  • 13 october 2006

    Uncompleted Transition

    Inherent weaknesses of the newly independent countries include not only high social costs and poor product quality, but also a shortage of managerial capital with the experience and abilities required to successfully compete on the global market.

  • 8 may 2006

    Ukraine – Growth and Gas

    The intricate overlapping of economic ties, corporate relations and political problems has made the issue of Gazprom’s relations with gas consumers in the CIS countries very difficult, and here we have an interesting case where the Russian side is objectively interested in depoliticizing economic relations.

  • 21 november 2005

    Statehood: The Regional Dimension

    Russia clearly needs to rely on a couple dozen big and prosperous cities capable of developing rapidly in some key areas. These cities are located especially near seas and oceans, and at communication hubs in important border areas. It is equally important that they have a business and political elite with a sense of local patriotism; individuals who are not prepared to jump ship and move to Moscow at any moment, while sending their offspring abroad with the bulk of their capital.

  • 18 may 2005

    Russia’s Place in the Global Economy

    Issues involving the development and modernization of the Russian economy came to the forefront of public debate as Russia recorded its fifth consecutive year of economic growth. Russia has extensive resources but few variants for using them.

  • 17 may 2003

    Looking Into the Future

    Russia and Europe are now economically more dependent upon each other than ever before. For the first time, energy imports have become very vital for the European economy, and this importance will continue growing in the future. Russia, the main supplier of energy resources to the EU, is no less dependent on Europe

  • 16 november 2002

    The 21st Century: Diverging Paths of Development

    The developing world, now Russia included, will not catch up with the developed countries. At the turn of the millennium the growth rates of the three main groups of states evened up. This means that the gap between them is being preserved rather than narrowed and that their drawing closer together is practically impossible. The chance to make a breakthrough by channeling the resources made available by the end of the Cold War was lost. .

1
Archives
Choose year
Choose issue
Publisher's column

Where to Go and with Whom to Go: Russia’s Foreign Policy on the Threshold of a New Decade

Russia is entering a new decade with significant (and I am even tempted to say brilliant) foreign and defense policy achievements, and with a substantial margin of strength. But the challenges and problems lying ahead are fraught with deceleration or even rollback.

Editor's column

Roaring Twenties again: 'Global impeachment' and the end of the era of liberal globalization

Now that another decade has flown by and the world awaits the arrival of 2020, it is only appropriate to look back at last century's 'Roaring Twenties'. Those twenties started globalization; these could see the end of its era.


How Cozy Is Russia and China’s Military Relationship?

Russia and China’s strategic military cooperation is becoming ever closer. President Putin has announced that Russia is helping China build an early warning system to spot intercontinental ballistic missile launches.

A “Synchronized Downturn” Calls for a “Synchronized Response”

This year’s Annual meetings of the IMF and the World Bank in Washington DC revealed a growing preoccupation with the mounting signs of a slowdown in the world economy.

How to Stop NATO

Catherine the Great is credited with saying that the only way to secure the borders of the Russian Empire is to expand them continuously. This logic is to some degree applicable to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, which embarked on a path of geographical enlargement quite literally from the very first days of its existence.

The Asian Mirror for the Far East: an Indian Perspective

India and Russia have long shared geopolitical perspectives on the balance of power in Eurasia. In the post-Cold War era both turned their attention to the West. However, over the past decade India has pursued the Look East Policy, seeking to regain its political and economic influence in Southeast Asia and building new strategic partnerships with East Asian powers like Japan and South Korea. Russia’s Turn to the East and India’s move from the Look East to the Act East Policy have created a new framework for closer India–Russia geo-economic and geopolitical relations.

Russian Far East Development from the Korean Perspective

This chapter focuses on analysing Korea’s position on development of this region. To this end, the paper deals with the significance and strategic value of the Russian Far East, the current status, and determinants of the Russian Far East policy, as well as the direction and tasks of Korea’s Russian Far East policy.